It’s official! Zombie Boy has won best web comic of 2016!

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Voted on by a jury of his peers, Mark Stokes has won the most prestigious of all webcomic awards.  The Root Beer Party award for Best Web Comic of 2016.  It has been quite a year for Zombie Boy.  First marking his 900th comic and then being nominated for the Harvey Award and now 2016 has finally given him the top prize!  Congratulations Mark!  Zombie Boy is the best.

What can we say about the man who practically invented web comics?

Zombie Boy began back in ancient times, back in the 1980’s.  Mark was a visionary who was 20 years ahead of his time.  Working on the independent comic scene Zombie Boy comics made his comic debut in 1987.

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But it wasn’t until 2015 that we finally got the culmination of his work in printed form with Zombie Boy:  Some Kind of Horrible, the first volume of collected comics from Zombie Boy’s transition from comic book icon into the field of webcomics.

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Mark’s influence goes well beyond the medium of artist.  There are very few comic creators who have been so supportive of their time and talent to helping others in the field.  As we are ever expanding the rank and file of the Root Beer Party, in interview after interview, when asked about an important influence, Mark’s name seems to always come up.  He encourages people and offers them the advice from years of being in the business and he knows all the pitfalls and traps that he has either helped people avoid or helped them through.

If there was a patron saint of the webcomic world, Mark would be canonized by the voodoo  priests who brought Morgan McCorkindale back to life on his fateful family vacation to Voodoo Island.

We look forward to another year of Zombie Boy comics and if Mark keeps it up, we may find history repeating itself again in 2017.  So we raise our mugs of root beer tonight in honor of Zombie Boy and Mark Stokes!  We hope the party of the undead never ends.  Congratulations on the award Mark, you deserve it.  (There was a large cash prize that went with the award, but we spent it all on root beer, sorry.)

You can read Zombie Boy here: http://www.zombieboycomics.com/

You can order your copy of Some Kind of Horrible here: https://www.amazon.com/Zombie-Boy-Some-Kind-Horrible/dp/0986440302/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1474158402&sr=8-1&keywords=zombie+boy+some+kind+of+horrible+by+mark+stokes

Until next time True Believers, may your mug always be frosted and your root beer Always foamy.

20 Questions with Comic Artists: Jonathan Murdock of Dungeon Hordes

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We are back once again True Believers with another entry into our world famous interview segment 20 Questions with Comic Artists.  Today we have with us the newest member of the Root Beer Party, Jonathan Murdock.

His comic can be seen here: http://www.dungeonhordes.com

Dungeon Hordes is a comic about a video game, or life within the video game, as the character sprites have achieved self awareness and look to elevate their position in life, or better put within the game. 

The comic centers around 2 level 5 bosses Tiggz and Tomes who are looking to finally beat Player One and rise in the ranks in order to pay off their bar tab.  Dungeon Hordes is a game that was released in the 1970’s and again in the 80’s and finally the newest version has been released and the level 5 bosses want to make a name for themselves finally.  This is one of the more clever concepts for a comic that I have seen as it explores a world within a world, I would highly recommend you check this one out.  Now let’s meet the man behind the innovation:  Jonathan Murdock:

Question 1: What got you started in doing a comic series?

I’ve been drawing comics since I was 12 when I started my first comic called “Harry and Larry”.  Back in 1985 I got  a cassette recorder for my birthday and I started doing little skits and made up two characters called Harry, a tall harry guy, and Larry, a short fat harry guy. They were based off these puppets that K-Mart used to sell and I actually got one for Christmas. A friend and I used to make him say all this stupid stuff that was hilarious for a kid. These tapes were pretty vulgar and I think I had around 6 of them. I would let my friends borrow them and I guess they made copies of them and they got around school. I remember at lunchtime I heard some kids in the next table talking about one of the stories that I did and laughing, but was too embarrassed to say anything. Needless to say the principal got a hold of it and found out it was me. This principal was also the Bishop of our church and he called a meeting with my Mom and I to listen to one of the tapes. He told my Mom, “Mrs. Murdock, I want you to listen to this tape that your son made.”  Well, we listened to the whole thing and I ended up laughing at most of it, which got me in even more trouble. After that I started to make comics about them for my own amusement.

In high school I decided to expand the Harry and Larry universe and created  a character that I called Funny Feet Man. Funny Feet Man was this clown who made pizza using his stinky feet and is a personal favorite of mine. I’ll sneak him into a Dungeon Hordes strip every once in awhile. I would also do mini comics of video games that I was playing at the time . . . Super Mario, Double Dragon, numerous Dungeons and Dragons comics.

As I got older I did another series called “The Adventures of Jim Sarvary” that was based off of a co-worker, and that is when I saw it . . . My Wife used to get me books on drawing from the library and she ended up getting, “How to Make Webcomics.” This really blew me away because I could actually have a real audience and share it with the world. I spent that whole night thinking about what kind of comic I would like to see . . . I really like the chibi art in the old 80’s Nintendo manuals so it would be that set in a fantasy setting. . . That was when Dungeon Hordes was born.


Question 2: Who was you greatest influence?

I actually have more than one. Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird when they did the old black and white “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles”, through them I discovered Stan Sakai, creator of “Usagi Yojimbo”, Sergio Aragones who did cartoons in “Mad Magazine and creator of “Groo the Wanderer” also a big Dungeon Hordes influence and finally, Tetsuo Hara who illustrated “Hakuto No Ken” which was my first introduction to manga. I was never a big DC or Marvel fan even though I would pick up a book every once in awhile.


Question 3: What is your favorite root beer and why?

I would say Barqs . . . It’s got a nice bite and really goes down smooth with some peppered habanero jerky.

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Question 4: What do you hope to accomplish with your comic?

I would say I’m accomplishing it right now . . . drawing comics helps me to relax and forget about the world for a bit . . . when I draw I just let go and let the ink flow for a couple hours. I liken it to meditation.


Question 5: Do you have any other artistic interests outside of comics?

I like to draw fantasy art and I want to dabble in some acrylics. I also want to get back into fantasy miniature painting again.


Question 6: Do you see yourself as a professional cartoonist, or is this just something you do for yourself?

I’ll just say I hope that something I do for myself turns into a profession.


Question 7: What type of subject or humor do you consider out of bounds for your strips and why?

I try to keep Dungeon Hordes family friendly . . . although I do other comics that can push the envelope a tad bit.

Question 8: What kind of equipment or style of drawing do you use?

I pencil with a Zebra M301 0.5 with hb lead . . .I’ve been using this since 2012. For inking I use numerous Sharpie pens, and then I finalize it with an old school Photoshop CS3. As for my style I love drawing in black and white . . . I did a poll at Deviant Art to see if people wanted color and they chose black and white. I then started to do a Sunday color strip and got good reception so I left that in. The style that I draw my characters in was based off the chibi art that I saw in “Kid Icarus” Nintendo game manual.

Question 9: what sort of training or academic program did you pursue to become a cartoonist?

Nothing, really. I just drew a lot.

Question 10: What has been the highlight of your cartooning career?

The highlight would be is that since I started this strip in January 1, 2011 . . . I never missed a day.  I started out doing a three day a week strip, and then moved to a daily and during that time my deadlines have been flawless.


Question 11: What has been the lowest point in your cartooning career?

The low point is when the week is so busy that I start to get behind. I end up having to draw for well over ten hours straight to get caught up for the week.


Question 12: Are collections of your work available beyond the web? If So where?

I do have a book ready but it’s so basic. The stuff that’s in the book people could just find it online . . . so to remedy that I’m gonna draw up some bonus comics, maps and character profiles to juice it up a bit.


Question 13: Are there any other web comic artists that you really admire?

Wow, there are actually too many to name . . . It takes me a couple hours to catch up on all of my favs.

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Question 14: What kind of impact has cartooning had on your life and could you ever see yourself not doing it?

Cartooning is a part of me. If it was taken away I don’t know what I would do. Being without it is like a surfer being without the ocean, I usually keep some extra pens and paper at work to help get me through the day.


Question 15: Do you have any advice for the Trolls out there who harass content creators? (no need to keep this answer clean.)

No, but I do have advice for the victims . . . Don’t feed the trolls. If someone says something negative, don’t respond. Ignoring the troll is the best weapon.


Question 16: Do you set yourself any deadlines or other tricks to keep yourself motivated?

I usually try and finish nine strips a week for a good buffer. As for motivation, drawing is my high so it’s easy to always keep the ball rolling.


Question 17: Apart from root beer, what is your favorite drink?

We have a restaurant here called, “Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers” and their lemonade is epic!

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Question 18: Are you already a member of the root beer party and if not, what is the matter with you?

If it’s like The Inglorious Bastards then consider me Hugo Stiglitz!

Question 19: What is the most challenging aspect of cartooning for you?

The most challenging it the sitting . . . I need to get one of those elevator desks.


Question 20: What are your future plans involving web comics or anything else going on in your life?

I would like to finish this book as well as finish up my side comics. I also need to organize my strips and put them in order. Right now they are sitting in a huge box in my closet.

And there you have it True Believers, another new interview with the ever expanding Root Beer Party.  We work tirelessly to bring you all the best the web has to offer in comics and in root beer appreciation.  A special shout out to James Boyd of Sunny Side Up Comics for facilitating many of these interviews.  He is the Ambassador of the Root Beer Party.  Welcome to the party Jonathan, pull yourself a fresh mug of Barq’s root beer, (yes, we keep it on tap) and let us raise a glass to our newest member and to Dungeon Hordes, a comic which is long overdue to be inducted into the Official Root Beer Party Comic Archives.

As always, True Believers, may your mug always be frosted and your root beer always foamy.     
 

 

 

 

20 Questions with Comic Artists: Anthony “Antwon” Hunter of Silent Sillies

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We are back once again True Believers with the induction of yet another new member of the Root Beer Party.  Yes, it’s Anthony Hunter of Silent Sillies.  Wow, what a big announcement this is.  One of the best web comics on the planet has stopped by the chat with us over  root beer.

It has been a long time since we have seen a great pantomime strip.  Not since Jon Esparza retired Mike & Mindy in fact.  In the tradition of Henry or Spy vs. Spy the pantomime strip is a classic medium in comics and one of the hardest to do consistently.  It demands amazing ability from the artist to convey in image rather than words the content of the strip. 

It relies heavily on the use of slapstick comedy which is very difficult to draw without great ability on the part of the artist who must have a great knowledge of anatomy in order to exaggerate the illusion of movement in a strip. 

Silent Sillies, which an be found here: http://www.silentsillies.com/ is drawn in the classic style of the cartoons of the silent era, right up to the advent of sound in Steamboat Willy by Walt Disney. 

But let’s hear from the man himself and meet the genius behind one of the hottest comics on the web today:

Thank you so much for this amazing opportunity! I’m truly honored to be asked for an interview by Root Beer party. Learning you consist of so many wonderful web comic artists makes me so excited for this interview.
Question 1: What got you started in doing a comic series?
I use to work night audit and so I had a lot of free time to work on comic ideas.
Question 2: Who was your greatest influence?
With Silent Sillies being a classic cartoon comic I look to early animation for a lot of influence. I really love Ub Iwerks and Chuck Jones, but I also find influence in modern cartoons, comics, webcomics, and newspaper comics. I really found a lot of influence from Garfield strips for art, and for stories I love the early Mickey Mouse newspaper comics by Floyd Gottfredson and the Muppets comic strip by Guy Gilchrist.
Question 3: What is your favorite root beer and why?
I use to love Mug back in the 90’s, but now I live near an A&W and I really love that.
Question 4: What do you hope to accomplish with your comic?
Daily syndication has been a big dream of mine. I suppose a larger goal might be if Silent Sillies could become a profitable franchise with a daily comic strip, books and animations. That would awesome. I’m not sure if I have the following for those kind of dreams yet, but it would be awesome to see happen.
Question 5: Do you have any other artistic interests outside of comics?
Animation. I have a bachelor’s degree in animation, and I watch A LOT of cartoons. I think now is the time to try and animate Silent Sillies.
Question 6: Do you see yourself as a professional cartoonist, or is this just something you do for yourself?
I think being a professional means more than 50% of your income comes from art, so if that’s the case I’m not a professional. But I’m building my resume, and I’m finding more art jobs lately, so hopefully my answer will change soon..
Question 7: What type of subject or humor do you consider out of bounds for your strips and why?
I like to keep Silent Sillies fun for all ages, so I stick to slapstick comedy mostly.
Question 8: What kind of equipment or style of drawing do you use?
I use google docs to write down my ideas and scripts and see what my best friend and Editor thinks. Then I use Adobe Illustrator to clean up my sketches. I also love how with Illustrator you can copy and paste existing art. This is especially useful since all the characters have the same type of arms and hands.
Question 9: What sort of training or academic program did you pursue to become a cartoonist?
I have a bachelor’s degree in animation but I’m self taught with Illustrator and making comics.

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Question 10: What has been the highlight of your cartooning career?
Honestly just knowing I’m helping to bring a laugh to someone is very rewarding. Watching people laugh when they see my art, and reading comments when I post a new comic is an amazing feeling. Also working on Lamebrains a comic book produced by a local comic book company was very exciting!
Question 11: What has been the lowest point in your cartooning career?
I get pretty down that I don’t get to work on this stuff daily and when my computer crashed a few weeks ago I felt it was over, but I began finding some back ups here and there which helped me to continue. Also after I posted a video clip for an animated Silent Sillies and I saw how many people liked seeing that I knew I needed to finish it.
Question 12: Are collections of your work available beyond the web? If so where?
I have some of my prints and comic books available on etsy. https://www.etsy.com/shop/SilentSilliesShophttps://www.etsy.com/shop/SilentSilliesShop
Question 13: Are there any other web comic artists that you really admire?

There are many, but a few of them include;
Jimmy Steen creator of Drawn Closer. http://www.drawncloser.comhttp://www.drawncloser.com
Brad Perri creator of Pirate Mike. https://piratemikecomics.comhttps://piratemikecomics.com
David Reddick with Intelligent Life. http://intelligentlifecomics.comhttp://intelligentlifecomics.com
Andrew Morrice and his MANY comics! http://granitoons.deviantart.comhttp://granitoons.deviantart.com

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Question 14: What kind of impact has cartooning had on your life and could you ever see yourself not doing it?
Honestly cartoons make more sense to me than the real world. I can’t imagine myself without watching and making cartoons.
Question 15: Do you have any advice for the Trolls out there who harass content creators? (No need to keep this answer clean.)
The mean spirited fanboys are really baffling to me. I still try to live by the golden rule so I just try to be a positive influence and help support others and share some silly where I can.
Question 16: Do you set yourself any deadlines or other tricks to keep yourself motivated?
I try to stay a couple of months ahead with my comic, and seeing other cartoons and comics keeps me motivated. Positive feedback from others helps to keep me going too.
Question 17: Apart from root beer, what is your favorite drink?
Pepsi, and Surge with the recent revival of that. But honestly I’m trying to cut out pop, so it’s mostly Coffee and water for me.

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Question 18: Are you already a member of the root beer party and if not, what is the matter with you?
Is that an invitation? (Of Course) – Editor
Question 19: What is the most challenging aspect of cartooning for you?
Life. Continuing to create after spending most of my day staring at numbers can be hard. Surprisingly the day job is also the biggest drive to work harder on art too.
Question 20: What are your future plans involving web comics or anything else going on in your life?
I’m really thinking I need to animate the Silent Sillies characters. I dream of syndication, but for now I’ll be collecting each year as a comic book and creating new prints for sale.

So there you have it True Believers, the newest member of the Root Beer Party, the incomparable Anthony “Antwon” Hunter, so raise a mug of your favorite frothy blend to “Antwon” and welcome him to the party, and as always True Believers, may your mug always be frosted and your root beer always foamy. 

20 Questions with Comic Artists: Frank Altomari of Pink & Black

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We are back once again True Believers with another new exciting debut of our world renowned, award winning, life changing segment 20 Questions with comic artists.  This is where we introduce to you the newest members of the Root Beer Party and the amazing comics that are available on the web.  So join us in taking a look behind the scenes of Pink & Black by the newest addition to the Root Beer Party, Frank Altomari

You can check out Frank’s comic Pink & Black here: http://pinkandblackcomic.tumblr.com/

Let’s meet Frank:

Question 1: What got you started in doing a comic series?
For a long time, I wanted to draw a comic but artistically never felt like I could do it. I’d attempt to draw what I was thinking and would always be disappointed in how it came out. Finally a good friend told me to just “draw it and worry about the way it looks later.” So I did.
Question 2: Who was you greatest influence?
My partner, Ray, was my greatest influence in developing the comic. You’d be surprised how much of what happens in Pink & Black is based in actual events.
Question 3: What is your favorite root beer and why?
I think A&W is pretty good. It’s nice and smooth. I’m more of a birch beer fan. Its medicinal redness speaks to me. Does that get me kicked out of the club?
(Birch Beer is acceptable to the Root Beer Party.  We embrace all variations of root beer.) -Editor  
Question 4: What do you hope to accomplish with your comic?
I hope I’ve created something that makes people happy. Or makes people laugh. I love shows like the British Are You Being Served? and comics like Calvin and Hobbes which create these wonderful characters and universes that you get to peek into every once in a while. Over time, like a crazy person, you actually start to care for the characters and worry about them a tiny bit. I’d like to accomplish that at some point.
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Question 5: Do you have any other artistic interests outside of comics?
In my day job, I’m a graphic designer for a large accounting firm. That really isn’t the most creative work in the world so outside of the office I sometimes create digital artwork using Photoshop and Illustrator.
Question 6: Do you see yourself as a professional cartoonist, or is this just something you do for yourself?
I am definitely not a professional cartoonist. The comic is just a way to work out some demons and to have a creative outlet.
Question 7: What type of subject or humor do you consider out of bounds for your strips and why?
My characters are nude 24/7 so I think my strip is as vulgar as it’s ever going to get.
Question 8: What kind of equipment or style of drawing do you use?
I’m pretty old-school. I pencil a rough comic on a normal piece of letter paper. Then I trace it in Micron pen using a light box. I then scan it and take it into Photoshop where I color it. Usually I do all the drawing and tracing while lying on the floor. There isn’t an ounce of professionalism in the entire process.
Question 9: What sort of training or academic program did you pursue to become a cartoonist?
I have an accounting degree from the early 1990s and a graphic design degree from the early 2000s. I think both of those have been useful in creating Pink & Black. They’ve both contributed to my overall lack of wealth. Great art comes from rough times.
Question 10: What has been the highlight of your cartooning career?
The highlight of my “career” was reaching #100. For me, that milestone meant that I’d probably be able to continue coming up with ideas for future strips.
Question 11: What has been the lowest point in your cartooning career?
Luckily, I really haven’t had one. I think because I’m just doing it for fun, I don’t feel any stress or pressure surrounding it.
Question 12: Are collections of your work available beyond the web? If so where?
Nope. Right now, an electromagnetic pulse from deep space would erase Pink & Black from history.
Question 13: Are there any other web comic artists that you really admire?
I’m really impressed with Skroode (www.skroode.com). He draws that comic in ink on Bristol paper. Each layout is something new and creative. The hand lettering alone on that comic is impressive.
Dust Piggies (https://dustpiggies.com) makes me laugh. I love the style of that comic. I’m blown away by the ability of someone to do the one-square comic and make it work. Growing up, I was a big fan of The Far Side and Herman.
Sunny Side Up (https://tapastic.com/series/Sunny-Side-) is another favorite. I honestly can’t believe that someone can create so many comics in one week. I can barely do one per week. And they’re funny. And loaded with references to things from the 80s and 90s.
Question 14: What kind of impact has cartooning had on your life and could you ever see yourself not doing it?
Cartooning has been great. I can remember drawing every single episode. Yet, I can’t remember conversations I’ve had with coworkers from 2 days ago. So that must mean something. I don’t think I’ll ever stop. It’s something I happily think about every single day.
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Question 15: Do you have any advice for the Trolls out there who harass content creators? (No need to keep this answer clean.)
I haven’t run into that yet. I’m not too worried about it though. Even though it can be strange and crudely-drawn, I’m very proud of Pink & Black. To be blunt, I don’t care if someone doesn’t like it. There are plenty of other webcomics out there to move on to if you hate my little guys. Besides, trolls really shouldn’t get on Black’s bad side.
Question 16: Do you set yourself any deadlines or other tricks to keep yourself motivated?
A while back, when I first showed my brother Pink & Black, he made me promise to do at least one episode a week. So that promise keeps me motivated.
Question 17: Apart from root beer, what is your favorite drink?
I really like bourbon. And scotch. And whiskey. Right now my favorite drink is Corsair Triple Smoke Whiskey.
Question 18: Are you already a member of the root beer party and if not, what is the matter with you?
Yes? No? I don’t know!
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Question 19: What is the most challenging aspect of cartooning for you?
For me it’s the promotion part of the whole thing. I feel like I should be looking for ways to get Pink & Black out there to more potential readers but the reclusive hermit in me always talks me out of it.
Question 20: What are your future plans involving web comics or anything else going on in your life?
I’d like to develop as an artist and storyteller. The longer I keep at it, the more I’ll feel that I have to keep Pink & Black interesting, both visually and in storyline. When I was younger, I’d always say “Look at my face. My facial expression didn’t even change while reading this comic.” (Usually it was a comic like Family Circus). So for me that’s the ultimate goal: to change your face.

 

And there you have it True Believers, another exciting episode of 20 Questions with comic artists and a new member of the Root Beer (or Birch Beer) Party!  Welcome to the party Frank.  So let’s raise our frosted mugs to Frank Altomari.  So go check out his comic and as always, True Believers,  may your mug always be frosted and your root beer always foamy. 

 

20 Questions with Comic Artists: Peter Rasmussen from Fatherhood Badly Doodled

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We are back once again True Believers to bring you another entry into our ever popular segment 20 Questions with Comic Artists.  Today we are going all the way to Denmark to bring you a glimpse of fatherhood, badly doodled.

That’s right the Root Beer Party is a global phenomenon with members all over the world, the one thing the world has in common is root beer and comics and we are here to unite the world by our celebration of both.

You can check out Peter Rasmussen’s comic website here: http://badlydoodled.com/olympic-special-badminton-day-2768/

Now let’s meet Peter, the newest member of the Root Beer Party:

Question 1: What got you started in doing a comic series?

It was a bit of a coincidence really. When my son, Oskar, was about three years old I started writing down the funny or cute little things he would come out with. However, I wasn’t sure what to do with all of these funny moments and I was afraid that someday I would get bored of noting them down or forget about it entirely – and then what was the point. Around the same timse I started getting fed up with not having a hobby and since I have always been a fairly creative person it really annoyed me that I wasn’t doing anything in my spare time. One day I was playing around on Paint with one of my son’s quotes and although it was ugly as hell I thought it had potential to be quite good fun. My comic was born. The only problem was that I hadn’t been drawing for what seemed like centuries so I would have to learn how to do that. A hobby was born! I was not very good at drawing when I started out so it has been a great creative journey for me. One where I have improved my drawing skills, refined my style and being able to see how I improve my work regularly which gives a huge sense of achievement. But best of all has been the journey I have had with my son. A journey that has made me more aware of what he says, his ideas and dreams and nutty observations. So, no Oskar, no comic. Luckily he finds them quite funny too.
Question 2: Who was you greatest influence?

With regards to content it’s my son. I would never have started making comics if it hadn’t been for him. In terms of style I don’t have a specific influence, but I have been reading comics my whole life and grew up with things like Calvin & Hobbes, Asterix, Spirou, Tintin, Mutts and so on. I also enjoy looking at black and white comics and graphic novels for inspiration.
Question 3: What is your favorite root beer and why?

I have a confession. Before I found out about The Root Beer Party I didn’t even know this drink existed. After a bit of research I’ve found that it’s very difficult to track down here in the UK, so I haven’t tasted the stuff yet. Also, I don’t think they do non-alcoholic drinks in England.

(We need to fix this, to paraphrase his own son “But why can’t everyone be friends?  Just sit down with a mug of root beer and talk about it?” ) -Editor
Question 4: What do you hope to accomplish with your comic?

Mainly that people find it funny and relatable, but also that it is something my son will enjoy looking at when he’s older. Of course it would be great to make a teeny bit of money one day, but at the moment I don’t have the brainpower and/or time to think about things like that.

Question 5: Do you have any other artistic interests outside of comics?

I used to do a lot of photography but it’s all about the comics now. I also like baking bread but not sure that is artistic.

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Question 6: Do you see yourself as a professional cartoonist, or is this just something you do for yourself?

I do it for myself. As mentioned earlier, it would be great one day to make a bit of money on this but it’s not my end goal. On a very basic level it’s all about documenting my time with my son and to have something we can look back and laugh at further down the line. We do that already and I love it when the comic makes him laugh.
Question 7: What type of subject or humor do you consider out of bounds for your strips and why?

All the conversations in my comic are real chats we’ve had, but I would never draw anything that would make my son sad or embarrassed.
Question 8: What kind of equipment or style of drawing do you use?

This has changed a bit over the years as I have learned more and more about what’s out there. I started out with pencils, a rubber and cartridge paper. Now I draw on Bristol board using non-photo blue pencil for my outlines and a variety of fine-liners for the final drawing. I do this on an A3 clipboard while I watch Netflix with my wife. If we watch a boring show I can finish a comic in one evening, but if we watch something like The Walking Dead it could take between 2-5 evenings. Finally, I correct my many mistakes in Photoshop and add the dialogue using my own font.
Question 9: What sort of training or academic program did you pursue to become a cartoonist?

I haven’t had any training and I was always fairly mediocre at drawing. Starting this comic has been a great journey in learning and improving my drawing skills. I get a real sense of achievement when I look at my old work compared to now.
Question 10: What has been the highlight of your cartooning career?

“Meeting” so many supportive, nice and funny comic creators online. I didn’t know what a webcomic was when I started out and certainly had no idea how many there were out there. I think the entire webcomic community online is amazing and it has blown me away how many talented creators there are and how generous everyone seem to be.
Question 11: What has been the lowest point in your cartooning career?

I haven’t really had one yet but I am sure it will come. There are those days when all the drawings don’t look the way you want them to, but I wouldn’t class those as low points. More like “shouting in to the pillow”-points.
Question 12: Are collections of your work available beyond the web? If So where?

Not yet, but I hope to start work on something in the near future. I have said that for a year now but life gets in the way. A lot.
Question 13: Are there any other web comic artists that you really admire?

There are so many and it would be unfair to single out anyone because it means that many others will be left out. However, since you’re twisting my arm….Zombie Boy, Jay Unplugged, Ninja & Pirate, Julie Rau, Dogs, Ducks & Aliens, Sunny Side Up, Jon Esparza, Tut & Groan, Fat Bassist, Small Blue Yonder and DazzWorld (and sorry to all you talented people I haven’t mentioned!).
Question 14: What kind of impact has cartooning had on your life and could you ever see yourself not doing it?

I dread the day I run out of material but luckily my son doesn’t seem to be running out of funny comments. I also have a huge backlog of notes so I can probably keep doing this till he’s 30. So no, I can’t see myself not doing this. It is the thing that keeps me sane after a long day in the office. It gives me a huge sense of achievement and it makes me feel closer to my son.
Question 15: Do you have any advice for the Trolls out there who harass content creators? (no need to keep this answer clean.)

I haven’t been exposed to any yet but I don’t get them. I really don’t understand what they get out of harassing people online. They should just get a life and spend the energy on something more worthwhile. Like move to a desert island.

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Question 16: Do you set yourself any deadlines or other tricks to keep yourself motivated?

I have enough deadlines at work so I don’t want any of that business when I do the fun stuff (i.e. comics). I try and draw at least two comics a week and keep a buffer of at least 3 comics but other than that I don’t have deadlines.
Question 17: Apart from root beer, what is your favorite drink?

I love coffee. I also like beer so if any of you are ever in London I’d love to buy you a drink
Question 18: Are you already a member of the root beer party and if not, what is the matter with you?

I am now. I think? Sorry.

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Question 19: What is the most challenging aspect of cartooning for you?

To get what’s in my head down on paper. I’m still not able to make my characters look the same from panel to panel. I’d be great to do that one day but it’s not the end of the world.. I also wish I had more time to read all my favorite webcomics and interact with all the great creators.
Question 20: What are your future plans involving web comics or anything else going on in your life?

I’d love to put a book together one day. That would be fun. I also thought I’d be fun to start an Etsy account and make greeting cards. Finally, the children’s charity I work for has started to ask me for illustrations, which is great. So hopefully I will do more of that soon. However, most importantly I hope I can keep improving my illustrations and keep having fun while I do it. That’s all that really matters.

And there you have it True Believers, what really divides us as a world?  Not enough root beer.  If everyone would sit down over a mug of root beer and talk it out, all the world’s problems would be solved.  I guess we’ll have to wait until Peter’s son becomes a world leader to sort it all out, but until then just be happy you can take time out of the day for a nice cold root beer.

We welcome peter into the Root Beer Party and raise our frosted mugs in his honor, may the UK finally realize what they are missing and begin brewing their own root beer for all to enjoy.  Until next time True Believers, may your mug always be frosted and your root beer always foamy.

The 3rd Root Beer Party Toon off

“It is a Comic
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.”

True Believers, it has happened again.  We have once again engaged in a world famous Root Beer Party toon off.

This toon off was once again a face off between me and Kim Belding of Picpak Dog Comics.  The comic category selections were made by John Esparza of Bubblefox and I demanded an impartial judge to be named, and we choose James Boyd of Sunny Side Up Comics.

You can check out their comics here:

Sunny Side Up: http://www.boydcomics.com/

Picpak Dog: http://www.picpak.net/

Bubblefox: http://bubblefox.thecomicseries.com/

 

Our first challenge was the old comic gag; slipping on a banana peel

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This was my entry into the first challenge

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This was Kim’s response.

Winner:  Me

All is going well so far True Believers, but now we come to when the conspiracy begins.

Round 2:  Handling live dynamite:

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Kim struck first with this entry, notice there is no dynamite or handling of dynamite in the comic, only an explosion which is attributed to chili.

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My entry a clever play on words as live dynamite becomes a Broadway play of Napoleon Dynamite and Mr. Blob can’t handle the excitement.

Winner:  Kim by Disqualification.

Our judge James claims that I am trying to influence him by having Sunny in the comic???  How is that influence???  Sunny doesn’t add anything to the gag, I also included Picpak, is that influencing Kim??  So Being egged on by Jon Esparza, James caved into peer pressure and awarded the round to Kim.

Round 3: A sharp object in the rear

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Kim once again struck first, but he should have spent more time on the gag.  This only works if you are familiar with a comic Kim did several years ago, as a stand alone gag to a impartial judge, it really doesn’t make sense.

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My gag works as a comic.  Even if you are unfamiliar with Picpak’s comic, it still works on it’s own.

Winner:  Tie for writing the same joke.  Clearly Jon is in James’s ear at this point.  My gag works on so many levels and fills in all the gaps to stand on it’s own.  Kim’s did not.

Round 4:  Large bolder

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Kim once again struck first and with a good gag.  He doubled down with the living under a rock pun, so good entry.

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Here I used Mr. Blob’s power of transforming into any shape to make him a bolder.  I like the gag, but Kim’s was a better strip.

Winner:  Kim Belding

Round 5: Inflation, inflate a secondary character

We can’t have a toon off without inflation.  Jon has some sort of helium addiction.  I think we might need to have an intervention.

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A good entry from Kim, he certainly picked up his game after losing the first 3 rounds.

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Now I did this to make a point.  Mr. Blob does not have a comic and therefore doesn’t have any secondary characters to inflate.  Jon picked this deliberately to fix the contest for Kim.  I choose Picpak and Wendy from Peppertown to inflate since they were both written by Kim and Jon who were obviously conspiring against me in this competition.

Winner: Kim Belding

So by their reasoning Kim tied or won 4 out of 5, but in reality he only won 2 out of 5 and had to have the Jon fix the final for him.  I called them on it and even found proof of their rigging the competition.  DSC04854

So the real winner of the 3rd toon off is Mr. Blob:

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But due to the collusion of the Co-Presidents and James giving into peer pressure Kim Belding was declared the official winner.  But this is not over True Believers.  Mr. Blob will still fight the good fight you can count on that.

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I’ll get you next time Belding!!!!!  Next Time!!!!!

20 Questions with Comic Artist: Madeline Holly-Rosing of Boston Metaphysical Society

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We are back once again True Believers, with our most popular segment here at The Root Beer Party.  It is time once again for 20 questions with comic artists.  Today we have the accomplished author of The Boston Metaphysical Society.  You can check it out here: http://bostonmetaphysicalsociety.com/

This is a continuity or graphic novel style comic set in a steampunk style universe.  Our heroes, the Boston Metaphysical Society, try to combat the evil of The Shifter, a man who can travel through space and time.

The comic has won multiple awards and is drawn by accomplished artists Emily Hu and colorists Gloria Caeli & Fahriza Kamaputra.  So lets get the low down from Madeline and welcome her to the Root Beer Party.

Question 1: What got you started in doing a comic series?
I originally wrote the comic as a TV Pilot when I was in the MFA Program in Screenwriting at UCLA. It was received well, but then several friends suggested I redevelop it as a comic for marketing reasons. I thought it was a good idea and took a sequential art class to learn how to write a comic. Lucky me! I discovered I loved indie comics.
Question 2: Who was your greatest influence?
Probably my classmates and instructor from the sequential art classes I took. (Nunzio DeFillippe, Christina Weir, Christina Strain, Han-Yee Ling, George Wassil, James Wright and Josh Henaman. And of course, Dave Elliot.)
Question 3: What is your favorite root beer and why?
Sorry, but I hate root beer.
(Shocked silence fills the room.  The tension is audible!)  
Question 4: What do you hope to accomplish with your comic?
The comic was originally designed to be a branding platform, but in the process I learned I loved writing comics!
Question 5: Do you have any other artistic interests outside of comics?
I can’t draw, but I used to play the flute in high school (jazz band and orchestra) and had a few piano and French Horn lessons. Does that count?

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Question 12: Are collections of your work available beyond the web? If So where?

Yes, there a digital special editions on DriveThruComics. Those include the complete chapter plus 30+ pages of extras in a pdf format. I also have them in print which you can purchase from me either at a Con or through my storenvy website.
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Question 13: Are there any other web comic artists that you really admire?
Absolutely. For strip type cartoons I’d include, Zombie Boy, Lunarbaboon, Pirate Mike, Ninja and Pirate and Sunny side Up, of course. For long form, there are too many to mention.
Question 15: Do you have any advice for the Trolls out there who harass content creators? (no need to keep this answer clean.) 
I’ve never been trolled… yet. I imagine it’s just a matter of time. I suspect it’s because the comic is alternate history and most trolls don’t read that.  If I were harassed, how I respond would depend on what they did. At Cons, I’ve had guys try to flirt, but they never crossed the line into harassment. I imagine that’s because I’m white, a little older (and taller) than other women working Cons and I have a very “take no prisoners” attitude.
Question 16: Do you set yourself any deadlines or other tricks to keep yourself motivated?
I do set myself deadlines and I’m getting better at time management. Since I do so many Cons during the year, a lot of my time is spent organizing for those, i.e., travel arrangements, hotels, taxes, inventory, etc. Motivation has never been a problem for me. My husband calls me mono-polar manic.
Question 17: Apart from root beer, what is your favorite drink?
Iced Tea.
Question 18: Are you already a member of the root beer party and if not, what is the matter with you?
No, I am not. I’d love to join if I can drink another type of beverage.
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Question 20: What are your future plans involving web comics or anything else going on in your life?
I hope to put together a trade next year of the six issues which will include something very special. (It’s a secret.). We are also working on funding 32 page one shots. And since the anthology (Boston Metaphysical Society: Prelude) is complete, I’m writing the first ever Boston Metaphysical Society novel. I’ve also had fans want an RPG, but one thing at a time.
Wow!  This is cutting edge stuff here True Believers.  We have never had a member who didn’t like root beer.  Well, she still meets the love of comics criteria so we will let it pass with an honorary membership.  Welcome to the party Madeline, and try the Butterscotch Root Beer, you will be very surprised by that one.  So raise your glass to the Boston Metaphysical Society and as always True Believers, may your mug always be frosted and your root beer always foamy.

 

20 Questions with Comic Artists: Chris Grabowski from Poorly Drawn Thoughts

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We are back once again True Believers with our world famous interview segment 20 Questions.   (Just when you thought it was safe to go back online.)  This time we bring you a new member of the Root Beer Party, Chris Grabowski from Poorly Drawn Thoughts, you can check out his site here: http://www.poorlydrawnthoughts.com/

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We give a special shout out to Fellow Root Beer Party Alum James Boyd of Sunny Side Up for inviting Chris to the party.  But enough about us let’s meet the man himself:

Question 1: What got you started in doing a comic series?
I was sitting in a meeting one day at my day job and doodling on my notes. A friend and coworker saw what I was doing and said “Hey, those are pretty funny. You should do a webcomic.” So, without doing any research on the subject what so ever, I started drawing comic strips. After I felt I had something I liked I started publishing them.
Question 2: Who was you greatest influence?
Probably R. Crumb. He has this really incredible mix of humor, eroticism and social commentary that I have never seen anywhere else. He’s pretty incredible.
Question 3: What is your favorite root beer and why?
I’m actually not much of a soda drinker. I mainly just stick to water and coffee. If I had to pick I would say Mug because I like the dog on the label.
Question 4: What do you hope to accomplish with your comic?
I don’t know. Maybe earn some money off of it? I’m primarily a hobbyist when it comes to comics so I never really thought about things I could accomplish by doing this.
Question 5: Do you have any other artistic interests outside of comics?
I’m actually a pretty skilled guitar/bass player. I’ve been playing for a little over fifteen years, now.
Question 6: Do you see yourself as a professional cartoonist, or is this just something you do for yourself?
This is definitely something I just do for myself.
Question 7: What type of subject or humor do you consider out of bounds for your strips and why?
I don’t care for anything that is too violent. Cartoony violence (like punching someone with your beard) is one thing, but nothing too realistic. Especially sexual violence. There’s just not anything funny or cool about that. I also don’t care for most racial humor. We’re in a position in our country where we need to take race relations seriously and I don’t feel like that sort of humor is really helping anything. Good humor to me is based on shared experiences and unfortunately a lot of experiences in regards to race are not shared between races and making jokes about these sorts of things lately seems like it’s doing more harm than good.

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Question 8: What kind of equipment or style of drawing do you use?
I use an Intuos 2.0 drawpad/stylus by Wacom. Also my stuff is made using Clip Studio Paint Pro Edition. Before that I was using a Nintendo 3DS and a copy of Comic Workshop. As for style, I would say super minimalist. Also, I drew (ha, see what I did there) a lot of inspiration from old RPG style video games. I always liked there cut scenes.
Question 9: what sort of training or academic program did you pursue to become a cartoonist?
I took a couple of drawing classes in college but that is pretty much it.
Question 10: What has been the highlight of your cartooning career?
I’ve gotten to know a lot of really great people because of cartooning and lately I’ve been using my comics to help raise money for Give Kids the World (go to GKTW.org for more information about them. They are an incredible organization). So if anything has been a highlight it is definitely the new friends and the charity work.

(Here is the link:  http://gktw.org/ )
Question 11: What has been the lowest point in your cartooning career?
This is a real cathartic experience for me so low points tend to be things like, ‘I don’t feel like I really got my point across with a comic,’ or if I look back at one and think ‘Wow I really could have done that better.’
Question 12: Are collections of your work available beyond the web? If So where?
Nope. I’ve been putting together a photo album of all my stuff but I haven’t really put much thought towards a book or anything.
Question 13: Are there any other web comic artists that you really admire?
James Boyd from “Sunny Side Up” has been really cool. Also Dave Rine from “Punks Against Punks” and Matthew Mewhorter from “Cancer Owl.” All three of those are all really incredible comics.
Question 14: What kind of impact has cartooning had on your life and could you ever see yourself not doing it?
It has definitely had a positive impact on me. Like I said earlier, this has been a cathartic experience and it really gives me a chance to work out those negative emotions (fear, anxiety, anger, etc.). I can definitely see myself keeping this up for the foreseeable future.
Question 15: Do you have any advice for the Trolls out there who harass content creators? (no need to keep this answer clean.)
People are just people. Sometimes people are awesome and encouraging and sometimes they’re just dicks. Just ignore them.
Question 16: Do you set yourself any deadlines or other tricks to keep yourself motivated?
I have a self-imposed deadline of two comics by every Monday. Also I tend to write down ideas I have throughout the day and that actually keeps me motivated because there is always something to draw about.
Question 17: Apart from root beer, what is your favorite drink?
Coffee. Black, dark roast coffee.
Question 18: Are you already a member of the root beer party and if not, what is the matter with you?
No. I just found out about you guys. I’m not very internet savvy and I tend to not spend a lot of time online.
Question 19: What is the most challenging aspect of cartooning for you?
Drawing things I’ve never drawn before. I’m the kind of person who really loves to be challenged, so I love to try and put things in to my comics that I just couldn’t before.
Question 20: What are your future plans involving web comics or anything else going on in your life?
I have a couple of projects I’m working on that I can’t really say much about. I don’t want to be in a position where I tell you I’m doing something and year’s later people are like ‘Whatever happened to that thing you talked about?’ And I’m like ‘Well I guess it fell through.’ Although I am drawing informative comics about animals for the kids at my son’s preschool. I keep them black and white so the kids can color them. You can find them on my Facebook (Facebook.com/PoorlyDrawnThoughts) and Twitter (Twitter.com/PoorlyDrawnGuy) pages.

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And there you have it True Believers, Straight from the man himself, welcome to the party Chris.  So we offer up a toast of Mug root beer (yes, the one with the dog on the label.) to chris Grabowski.  Check out his web page for more great comics as well as the Give Kids the World project.  And as always True Believers, until next time, may your mug always be frosted and your root beer always foamy.

The Making of a Comic Part 6: In the Beginning…

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For those of you who don’t know, Mr. Blob was actually the creation of a 10 year old  Canadian boy named Kim Belding.  From an early age he knew he wanted to be a comic artist, he would read Garfield and US Acres (AKA Orson’s Farm in Canada) and long to make those comics his own.

After exhaustive research through the Picpak Dog Comic Archives we have unearthed the original Mr. Blob comic strips.  How is it possible that these still exist you ask?  Well, even back then Kim must have known on some subconscious level that he was really on to something with Mr. Blob.  So let’s meet this icon of modern comics as he first appeared decades ago:

9mEh4E8 This is the original moment when history was made, when Picpak First met Mr. Blob.  This iconic scene was recreated many years later during one of the many incarnations of Mr. Blob that you have all grown to love.

DSC04460This is the modern recreation of that historic event.  Kim wasn’t satisfied with Mr. Blob and began experimenting with ideas but nothing really seemed to land.  He didn’t understand the whimsical insanity that we all know and love about Mr. Blob, but even back then you could see Mr. Blob influencing little Kim’s pen and helping him to shape the future that we know today.

xdHq0qLEven then Mr. Blob showed off his amazing talent for music.  He would later refine that style and become known throughout the world for his musical gift.

DSC04817Just a few of his many incarnations from Mr. Blob the Musical, a Tony Award winning musical and the shortest running play in Broadway history.  But as we can see, from these small sparks of genius comes the amazing advancements to the history of comics as we know it today.

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Here is where we learn that Mr. Blob likes to eat records, although in this comic Little Kim thinks they are made of Polyester but he address’ that in the next comic.

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Although Kim has not mentioned that Mr. Blob is an alien, his exotic ways are clear for all to see.  His powers continue to manifest themselves in the following strips.

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Now how, do you ask, did Kim not know that he was on to something amazing here?  It really is a mystery.  I suppose it has something to do with the winters in Canada or something like that.  Maybe he was distracted by a hockey game or someone apologized and gave him a doughnut, we may never know the answer, but fortunately he saved the strips and after casually sharing them on his Peatron page, Mr. Blob was once again given a chance to live.

Kim continued to work with the character a bit more, but never seemed to fully grasp the infinite possibilities that Mr. Blob offered him.

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There were a lot of hungry jokes in this weeks strips and Jon Esparza might not be too happy to see Mr. Blob eating one of his favorite characters The Ant, but there are bound to be casualties in the creation of a comic icon.  We can really date the comic here with it’s reference to Ferby toys in the next strip.

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Kim even back then was known for his puns and wordplay gags.  but little did he know how much this last strip would play into his future.  It was probably for the best that he stopped here.  If he had continued he might have broken through the space-time continuum and changed the course of the universe forever.  The signs were clear, even then of what the future held in store for Mr. Blob:

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Mr. Blob tried his first taste of Helium.  It would not be his last.  Was this comic a secret message like the Da Vinci Code?  Did time traveling Root Beer Party members tell a young Kim Belding to draw this strip to insure that he would be prepared for the future as a Co-Founder of the Root Beer Party?  Did Skynet send Terminators back in time to try to stop Kim from making this comic and try to defeat the resistance before it even began?  Did the Mr. Blob comic become self aware and ensure it’s survival through foreshadowing a gag it glimpsed through some temporary dimensional portal?

We may never know the answers, but the stars did align and Mr. Blob was preserved for the moment in time when we would all need him the most.  And now True Believers, you know the truth about the creation of Mr. Blob.  There are still many questions to be answered, but that is the way with knowledge, the more we think we know about…  the greater the unknown.

Until next time True Believers, may your mug always be frosted and your root beer always foamy.

 

 

20 Questions with Comic Artists: James Florence of Jay Unplugged

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We are back once again with our world famous segment here at the Root Beer Party, It’s time for 20 Questions.  (Crowd goes wild)  Yes, that’s right, you demanded it and once again, we deliver.  Today we bring you the embodiment of the Evil Dead himself James Florence of Jay Unplugged which you can check out here:

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Here we have a man who has serious issues with his computer so we’ll get right down to business:

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Question 1: What got you started in doing a comic series?
I’ve been interested in doing comics for pretty much my whole life; as a kid, I used to daydream about having my own little studio with the drawing table and everything. Alas, by age 30, that dream had still not come to fruition. It wasn’t until a couple years ago, when my wife took me to see a special screening of the documentary “Stripped,” that I realized I needed to buckle down and make it happen. I had these characters I’d conceived of a couple years prior—a guy, his laptop and radio—so I picked them back up and the rest is history.
Question 2: Who was you greatest influence?
Without a doubt, my number one influence was and still is “Calvin and Hobbes”. I spent countless hours reading it during my childhood, and still revisit it regularly. In particular, I admire how Bill Watterson uses the comic medium to express not just humor but deep emotion and profound truth. His depth, versatility and tonal balance are what I strive to replicate in my own work.
Question 3: What is your favorite root beer and why?
Usually, I go for good old Mug root beer. I also remember Henry Weinhard’s being really good, but it’s been a while since I’ve had it.
Question 4: What do you hope to accomplish with your comic?
My goal is to build an audience and get as many people as possible to read my stuff. Heck, I’d like to one day do it for a living, of course. However, in the end, I think my personal satisfaction in my work is the most important thing.
Question 5: Do you have any other artistic interests outside of comics?
I love music and movies. Before I got into comics, my main artistic outlet was music: I’ve played both guitar and drums in several bands and even produced my own solo album. I still enjoy jamming with friends and hope to do more recording in the future.
Question 6: Do you see yourself as a professional cartoonist, or is this just something you do for yourself?
Definitely not a professional. Maybe when someone offers me a large sum of money to do this, I’ll consider myself a pro.
Question 7: What type of subject or humor do you consider out of bounds for your strips and why?
None, really. I generally keep my strip pretty clean, just because I prefer it that way, but I also don’t mind pushing the envelope if the joke is there.
Question 8: What kind of equipment or style of drawing do you use?
I draw on a large 14”x17” pad, starting with non-photo blue lead and ending with black ink. I use two pens for inking: a 0.8mm Uni-Ball Vision Elite (I like the hard tip) and a Micron 0.25mm for finer lines. I draw my boxes with a 1.0mm pen. I also use an Ames guide for lettering, so the lines are straight. I do all my coloring in Photoshop.
Question 9: What sort of training or academic program did you pursue to become a cartoonist?
None whatsoever.
Question 10: What has been the highlight of your cartooning career?
Recently, I had the opportunity to be featured at the Charles M. Schulz Museum in my hometown of Santa Rosa. While I was there, Jeannie Schulz (Charles’ window) stopped by to say hi and asked me for the lowdown on the world of webcomics. It was quite a treat for me; I even got to give her a signed print.
Question 11: What has been the lowest point in your cartooning career?
About 3 or 4 months after I started “Jay Unplugged,” I hit a dry spell. I thought it was all over, and I moped and whined about having no good ideas and how I was doomed to fail at everything I attempted, blah, blah, blah. About a week later, I was back on the upswing, working on an inspired three-part arc. This taught me a crucial lesson about creating art: there will always be ups and downs, floods of inspiration and dry spells. The key is to hold on and ride through the tough times. Never give up.
Question 12: Are collections of your work available beyond the web? If So where?
Currently, no, but I’d love to do a print collection one of these days.
Question 13: Are there any other web comic artists that you really admire?
Oh yeah, a bunch, too many to name. Some of the stand-outs would be Poorly Drawn Lines, Lunarbaboon, Awkward Yeti, Fatherhood. Badly Doodled., Fat Bassist Comics, and Dogs, Ducks & Aliens.
Question 14: What kind of impact has cartooning had on your life and could you ever see yourself not doing it?
After dreaming for years about being a cartoonist, it’s very fulfilling for me to actually be doing it. Can I see myself not doing it? Sure. Would I be happy? I doubt it. While it’s often challenging and frustrating, in the end, making comics just makes me feel good – like I’m doing something, you know?
Question 15: Do you have any advice for the Trolls out there who harass content creators? (no need to keep this answer clean.)
Go find something you love.
Question 16: Do you set yourself any deadlines or other tricks to keep yourself motivated?
Keeping a regular update schedule is helpful, but I don’t give myself a hard time if I miss. The fact is, I’m not getting paid to do this and I have a lot of other responsibilities, so I’m not going to make a big deal about staying on schedule. One of the best motivators for me is having a continuing story arc, because the story kind of propels itself. Other than that, I just do my best to put out content regularly, whether once or twice each week.
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Question 17: Apart from root beer, what is your favorite drink?
Regular beer—preferably a craft-brewed IPA.
Question 18: Are you already a member of the root beer party and if not, what is the matter with you?
I think this questionnaire is my initiation. So… yes, yes, I am. I would’ve gotten to it sooner, but hey, I’m a busy guy.
Question 19: What is the most challenging aspect of cartooning for you?
Well, I’m not much of an artist, so it’s probably just drawing in general. Especially if I have to veer outside of conventional motif of Jay standing in front of a counter.
Question 20: What are your future plans involving web comics or anything else going on in your life?
I’m just gonna keep at it, and we’ll see what happens next.
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So there you have it True Believers, you heard it here first.  We have introduced you to the newest member of the Root Beer Party, so check out his comic and make him famous so he can work harder and make more comics and possibly afford more root beer.  We here at the Root Beer Party know that nothing pairs better with root beer than comics, both are things that make us all happy, so thanks to James for this introduction and welcome to the party.  And as always True Believers, May your mug always be frosted and your root beer always foamy.