20 Questions with Comic Artists: Frank Altomari of Pink & Black

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We are back once again True Believers with another new exciting debut of our world renowned, award winning, life changing segment 20 Questions with comic artists.  This is where we introduce to you the newest members of the Root Beer Party and the amazing comics that are available on the web.  So join us in taking a look behind the scenes of Pink & Black by the newest addition to the Root Beer Party, Frank Altomari

You can check out Frank’s comic Pink & Black here: http://pinkandblackcomic.tumblr.com/

Let’s meet Frank:

Question 1: What got you started in doing a comic series?
For a long time, I wanted to draw a comic but artistically never felt like I could do it. I’d attempt to draw what I was thinking and would always be disappointed in how it came out. Finally a good friend told me to just “draw it and worry about the way it looks later.” So I did.
Question 2: Who was you greatest influence?
My partner, Ray, was my greatest influence in developing the comic. You’d be surprised how much of what happens in Pink & Black is based in actual events.
Question 3: What is your favorite root beer and why?
I think A&W is pretty good. It’s nice and smooth. I’m more of a birch beer fan. Its medicinal redness speaks to me. Does that get me kicked out of the club?
(Birch Beer is acceptable to the Root Beer Party.  We embrace all variations of root beer.) -Editor  
Question 4: What do you hope to accomplish with your comic?
I hope I’ve created something that makes people happy. Or makes people laugh. I love shows like the British Are You Being Served? and comics like Calvin and Hobbes which create these wonderful characters and universes that you get to peek into every once in a while. Over time, like a crazy person, you actually start to care for the characters and worry about them a tiny bit. I’d like to accomplish that at some point.
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Question 5: Do you have any other artistic interests outside of comics?
In my day job, I’m a graphic designer for a large accounting firm. That really isn’t the most creative work in the world so outside of the office I sometimes create digital artwork using Photoshop and Illustrator.
Question 6: Do you see yourself as a professional cartoonist, or is this just something you do for yourself?
I am definitely not a professional cartoonist. The comic is just a way to work out some demons and to have a creative outlet.
Question 7: What type of subject or humor do you consider out of bounds for your strips and why?
My characters are nude 24/7 so I think my strip is as vulgar as it’s ever going to get.
Question 8: What kind of equipment or style of drawing do you use?
I’m pretty old-school. I pencil a rough comic on a normal piece of letter paper. Then I trace it in Micron pen using a light box. I then scan it and take it into Photoshop where I color it. Usually I do all the drawing and tracing while lying on the floor. There isn’t an ounce of professionalism in the entire process.
Question 9: What sort of training or academic program did you pursue to become a cartoonist?
I have an accounting degree from the early 1990s and a graphic design degree from the early 2000s. I think both of those have been useful in creating Pink & Black. They’ve both contributed to my overall lack of wealth. Great art comes from rough times.
Question 10: What has been the highlight of your cartooning career?
The highlight of my “career” was reaching #100. For me, that milestone meant that I’d probably be able to continue coming up with ideas for future strips.
Question 11: What has been the lowest point in your cartooning career?
Luckily, I really haven’t had one. I think because I’m just doing it for fun, I don’t feel any stress or pressure surrounding it.
Question 12: Are collections of your work available beyond the web? If so where?
Nope. Right now, an electromagnetic pulse from deep space would erase Pink & Black from history.
Question 13: Are there any other web comic artists that you really admire?
I’m really impressed with Skroode (www.skroode.com). He draws that comic in ink on Bristol paper. Each layout is something new and creative. The hand lettering alone on that comic is impressive.
Dust Piggies (https://dustpiggies.com) makes me laugh. I love the style of that comic. I’m blown away by the ability of someone to do the one-square comic and make it work. Growing up, I was a big fan of The Far Side and Herman.
Sunny Side Up (https://tapastic.com/series/Sunny-Side-) is another favorite. I honestly can’t believe that someone can create so many comics in one week. I can barely do one per week. And they’re funny. And loaded with references to things from the 80s and 90s.
Question 14: What kind of impact has cartooning had on your life and could you ever see yourself not doing it?
Cartooning has been great. I can remember drawing every single episode. Yet, I can’t remember conversations I’ve had with coworkers from 2 days ago. So that must mean something. I don’t think I’ll ever stop. It’s something I happily think about every single day.
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Question 15: Do you have any advice for the Trolls out there who harass content creators? (No need to keep this answer clean.)
I haven’t run into that yet. I’m not too worried about it though. Even though it can be strange and crudely-drawn, I’m very proud of Pink & Black. To be blunt, I don’t care if someone doesn’t like it. There are plenty of other webcomics out there to move on to if you hate my little guys. Besides, trolls really shouldn’t get on Black’s bad side.
Question 16: Do you set yourself any deadlines or other tricks to keep yourself motivated?
A while back, when I first showed my brother Pink & Black, he made me promise to do at least one episode a week. So that promise keeps me motivated.
Question 17: Apart from root beer, what is your favorite drink?
I really like bourbon. And scotch. And whiskey. Right now my favorite drink is Corsair Triple Smoke Whiskey.
Question 18: Are you already a member of the root beer party and if not, what is the matter with you?
Yes? No? I don’t know!
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Question 19: What is the most challenging aspect of cartooning for you?
For me it’s the promotion part of the whole thing. I feel like I should be looking for ways to get Pink & Black out there to more potential readers but the reclusive hermit in me always talks me out of it.
Question 20: What are your future plans involving web comics or anything else going on in your life?
I’d like to develop as an artist and storyteller. The longer I keep at it, the more I’ll feel that I have to keep Pink & Black interesting, both visually and in storyline. When I was younger, I’d always say “Look at my face. My facial expression didn’t even change while reading this comic.” (Usually it was a comic like Family Circus). So for me that’s the ultimate goal: to change your face.

 

And there you have it True Believers, another exciting episode of 20 Questions with comic artists and a new member of the Root Beer (or Birch Beer) Party!  Welcome to the party Frank.  So let’s raise our frosted mugs to Frank Altomari.  So go check out his comic and as always, True Believers,  may your mug always be frosted and your root beer always foamy. 

 

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20 Questions with Comic Artists: Peter Rasmussen from Fatherhood Badly Doodled

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We are back once again True Believers to bring you another entry into our ever popular segment 20 Questions with Comic Artists.  Today we are going all the way to Denmark to bring you a glimpse of fatherhood, badly doodled.

That’s right the Root Beer Party is a global phenomenon with members all over the world, the one thing the world has in common is root beer and comics and we are here to unite the world by our celebration of both.

You can check out Peter Rasmussen’s comic website here: http://badlydoodled.com/olympic-special-badminton-day-2768/

Now let’s meet Peter, the newest member of the Root Beer Party:

Question 1: What got you started in doing a comic series?

It was a bit of a coincidence really. When my son, Oskar, was about three years old I started writing down the funny or cute little things he would come out with. However, I wasn’t sure what to do with all of these funny moments and I was afraid that someday I would get bored of noting them down or forget about it entirely – and then what was the point. Around the same timse I started getting fed up with not having a hobby and since I have always been a fairly creative person it really annoyed me that I wasn’t doing anything in my spare time. One day I was playing around on Paint with one of my son’s quotes and although it was ugly as hell I thought it had potential to be quite good fun. My comic was born. The only problem was that I hadn’t been drawing for what seemed like centuries so I would have to learn how to do that. A hobby was born! I was not very good at drawing when I started out so it has been a great creative journey for me. One where I have improved my drawing skills, refined my style and being able to see how I improve my work regularly which gives a huge sense of achievement. But best of all has been the journey I have had with my son. A journey that has made me more aware of what he says, his ideas and dreams and nutty observations. So, no Oskar, no comic. Luckily he finds them quite funny too.
Question 2: Who was you greatest influence?

With regards to content it’s my son. I would never have started making comics if it hadn’t been for him. In terms of style I don’t have a specific influence, but I have been reading comics my whole life and grew up with things like Calvin & Hobbes, Asterix, Spirou, Tintin, Mutts and so on. I also enjoy looking at black and white comics and graphic novels for inspiration.
Question 3: What is your favorite root beer and why?

I have a confession. Before I found out about The Root Beer Party I didn’t even know this drink existed. After a bit of research I’ve found that it’s very difficult to track down here in the UK, so I haven’t tasted the stuff yet. Also, I don’t think they do non-alcoholic drinks in England.

(We need to fix this, to paraphrase his own son “But why can’t everyone be friends?  Just sit down with a mug of root beer and talk about it?” ) -Editor
Question 4: What do you hope to accomplish with your comic?

Mainly that people find it funny and relatable, but also that it is something my son will enjoy looking at when he’s older. Of course it would be great to make a teeny bit of money one day, but at the moment I don’t have the brainpower and/or time to think about things like that.

Question 5: Do you have any other artistic interests outside of comics?

I used to do a lot of photography but it’s all about the comics now. I also like baking bread but not sure that is artistic.

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Question 6: Do you see yourself as a professional cartoonist, or is this just something you do for yourself?

I do it for myself. As mentioned earlier, it would be great one day to make a bit of money on this but it’s not my end goal. On a very basic level it’s all about documenting my time with my son and to have something we can look back and laugh at further down the line. We do that already and I love it when the comic makes him laugh.
Question 7: What type of subject or humor do you consider out of bounds for your strips and why?

All the conversations in my comic are real chats we’ve had, but I would never draw anything that would make my son sad or embarrassed.
Question 8: What kind of equipment or style of drawing do you use?

This has changed a bit over the years as I have learned more and more about what’s out there. I started out with pencils, a rubber and cartridge paper. Now I draw on Bristol board using non-photo blue pencil for my outlines and a variety of fine-liners for the final drawing. I do this on an A3 clipboard while I watch Netflix with my wife. If we watch a boring show I can finish a comic in one evening, but if we watch something like The Walking Dead it could take between 2-5 evenings. Finally, I correct my many mistakes in Photoshop and add the dialogue using my own font.
Question 9: What sort of training or academic program did you pursue to become a cartoonist?

I haven’t had any training and I was always fairly mediocre at drawing. Starting this comic has been a great journey in learning and improving my drawing skills. I get a real sense of achievement when I look at my old work compared to now.
Question 10: What has been the highlight of your cartooning career?

“Meeting” so many supportive, nice and funny comic creators online. I didn’t know what a webcomic was when I started out and certainly had no idea how many there were out there. I think the entire webcomic community online is amazing and it has blown me away how many talented creators there are and how generous everyone seem to be.
Question 11: What has been the lowest point in your cartooning career?

I haven’t really had one yet but I am sure it will come. There are those days when all the drawings don’t look the way you want them to, but I wouldn’t class those as low points. More like “shouting in to the pillow”-points.
Question 12: Are collections of your work available beyond the web? If So where?

Not yet, but I hope to start work on something in the near future. I have said that for a year now but life gets in the way. A lot.
Question 13: Are there any other web comic artists that you really admire?

There are so many and it would be unfair to single out anyone because it means that many others will be left out. However, since you’re twisting my arm….Zombie Boy, Jay Unplugged, Ninja & Pirate, Julie Rau, Dogs, Ducks & Aliens, Sunny Side Up, Jon Esparza, Tut & Groan, Fat Bassist, Small Blue Yonder and DazzWorld (and sorry to all you talented people I haven’t mentioned!).
Question 14: What kind of impact has cartooning had on your life and could you ever see yourself not doing it?

I dread the day I run out of material but luckily my son doesn’t seem to be running out of funny comments. I also have a huge backlog of notes so I can probably keep doing this till he’s 30. So no, I can’t see myself not doing this. It is the thing that keeps me sane after a long day in the office. It gives me a huge sense of achievement and it makes me feel closer to my son.
Question 15: Do you have any advice for the Trolls out there who harass content creators? (no need to keep this answer clean.)

I haven’t been exposed to any yet but I don’t get them. I really don’t understand what they get out of harassing people online. They should just get a life and spend the energy on something more worthwhile. Like move to a desert island.

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Question 16: Do you set yourself any deadlines or other tricks to keep yourself motivated?

I have enough deadlines at work so I don’t want any of that business when I do the fun stuff (i.e. comics). I try and draw at least two comics a week and keep a buffer of at least 3 comics but other than that I don’t have deadlines.
Question 17: Apart from root beer, what is your favorite drink?

I love coffee. I also like beer so if any of you are ever in London I’d love to buy you a drink
Question 18: Are you already a member of the root beer party and if not, what is the matter with you?

I am now. I think? Sorry.

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Question 19: What is the most challenging aspect of cartooning for you?

To get what’s in my head down on paper. I’m still not able to make my characters look the same from panel to panel. I’d be great to do that one day but it’s not the end of the world.. I also wish I had more time to read all my favorite webcomics and interact with all the great creators.
Question 20: What are your future plans involving web comics or anything else going on in your life?

I’d love to put a book together one day. That would be fun. I also thought I’d be fun to start an Etsy account and make greeting cards. Finally, the children’s charity I work for has started to ask me for illustrations, which is great. So hopefully I will do more of that soon. However, most importantly I hope I can keep improving my illustrations and keep having fun while I do it. That’s all that really matters.

And there you have it True Believers, what really divides us as a world?  Not enough root beer.  If everyone would sit down over a mug of root beer and talk it out, all the world’s problems would be solved.  I guess we’ll have to wait until Peter’s son becomes a world leader to sort it all out, but until then just be happy you can take time out of the day for a nice cold root beer.

We welcome peter into the Root Beer Party and raise our frosted mugs in his honor, may the UK finally realize what they are missing and begin brewing their own root beer for all to enjoy.  Until next time True Believers, may your mug always be frosted and your root beer always foamy.

The 3rd Root Beer Party Toon off

“It is a Comic
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.”

True Believers, it has happened again.  We have once again engaged in a world famous Root Beer Party toon off.

This toon off was once again a face off between me and Kim Belding of Picpak Dog Comics.  The comic category selections were made by John Esparza of Bubblefox and I demanded an impartial judge to be named, and we choose James Boyd of Sunny Side Up Comics.

You can check out their comics here:

Sunny Side Up: http://www.boydcomics.com/

Picpak Dog: http://www.picpak.net/

Bubblefox: http://bubblefox.thecomicseries.com/

 

Our first challenge was the old comic gag; slipping on a banana peel

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This was my entry into the first challenge

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This was Kim’s response.

Winner:  Me

All is going well so far True Believers, but now we come to when the conspiracy begins.

Round 2:  Handling live dynamite:

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Kim struck first with this entry, notice there is no dynamite or handling of dynamite in the comic, only an explosion which is attributed to chili.

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My entry a clever play on words as live dynamite becomes a Broadway play of Napoleon Dynamite and Mr. Blob can’t handle the excitement.

Winner:  Kim by Disqualification.

Our judge James claims that I am trying to influence him by having Sunny in the comic???  How is that influence???  Sunny doesn’t add anything to the gag, I also included Picpak, is that influencing Kim??  So Being egged on by Jon Esparza, James caved into peer pressure and awarded the round to Kim.

Round 3: A sharp object in the rear

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Kim once again struck first, but he should have spent more time on the gag.  This only works if you are familiar with a comic Kim did several years ago, as a stand alone gag to a impartial judge, it really doesn’t make sense.

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My gag works as a comic.  Even if you are unfamiliar with Picpak’s comic, it still works on it’s own.

Winner:  Tie for writing the same joke.  Clearly Jon is in James’s ear at this point.  My gag works on so many levels and fills in all the gaps to stand on it’s own.  Kim’s did not.

Round 4:  Large bolder

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Kim once again struck first and with a good gag.  He doubled down with the living under a rock pun, so good entry.

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Here I used Mr. Blob’s power of transforming into any shape to make him a bolder.  I like the gag, but Kim’s was a better strip.

Winner:  Kim Belding

Round 5: Inflation, inflate a secondary character

We can’t have a toon off without inflation.  Jon has some sort of helium addiction.  I think we might need to have an intervention.

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A good entry from Kim, he certainly picked up his game after losing the first 3 rounds.

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Now I did this to make a point.  Mr. Blob does not have a comic and therefore doesn’t have any secondary characters to inflate.  Jon picked this deliberately to fix the contest for Kim.  I choose Picpak and Wendy from Peppertown to inflate since they were both written by Kim and Jon who were obviously conspiring against me in this competition.

Winner: Kim Belding

So by their reasoning Kim tied or won 4 out of 5, but in reality he only won 2 out of 5 and had to have the Jon fix the final for him.  I called them on it and even found proof of their rigging the competition.  DSC04854

So the real winner of the 3rd toon off is Mr. Blob:

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But due to the collusion of the Co-Presidents and James giving into peer pressure Kim Belding was declared the official winner.  But this is not over True Believers.  Mr. Blob will still fight the good fight you can count on that.

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I’ll get you next time Belding!!!!!  Next Time!!!!!

20 Questions with Comic Artist: Madeline Holly-Rosing of Boston Metaphysical Society

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We are back once again True Believers, with our most popular segment here at The Root Beer Party.  It is time once again for 20 questions with comic artists.  Today we have the accomplished author of The Boston Metaphysical Society.  You can check it out here: http://bostonmetaphysicalsociety.com/

This is a continuity or graphic novel style comic set in a steampunk style universe.  Our heroes, the Boston Metaphysical Society, try to combat the evil of The Shifter, a man who can travel through space and time.

The comic has won multiple awards and is drawn by accomplished artists Emily Hu and colorists Gloria Caeli & Fahriza Kamaputra.  So lets get the low down from Madeline and welcome her to the Root Beer Party.

Question 1: What got you started in doing a comic series?
I originally wrote the comic as a TV Pilot when I was in the MFA Program in Screenwriting at UCLA. It was received well, but then several friends suggested I redevelop it as a comic for marketing reasons. I thought it was a good idea and took a sequential art class to learn how to write a comic. Lucky me! I discovered I loved indie comics.
Question 2: Who was your greatest influence?
Probably my classmates and instructor from the sequential art classes I took. (Nunzio DeFillippe, Christina Weir, Christina Strain, Han-Yee Ling, George Wassil, James Wright and Josh Henaman. And of course, Dave Elliot.)
Question 3: What is your favorite root beer and why?
Sorry, but I hate root beer.
(Shocked silence fills the room.  The tension is audible!)  
Question 4: What do you hope to accomplish with your comic?
The comic was originally designed to be a branding platform, but in the process I learned I loved writing comics!
Question 5: Do you have any other artistic interests outside of comics?
I can’t draw, but I used to play the flute in high school (jazz band and orchestra) and had a few piano and French Horn lessons. Does that count?

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Question 12: Are collections of your work available beyond the web? If So where?

Yes, there a digital special editions on DriveThruComics. Those include the complete chapter plus 30+ pages of extras in a pdf format. I also have them in print which you can purchase from me either at a Con or through my storenvy website.
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Question 13: Are there any other web comic artists that you really admire?
Absolutely. For strip type cartoons I’d include, Zombie Boy, Lunarbaboon, Pirate Mike, Ninja and Pirate and Sunny side Up, of course. For long form, there are too many to mention.
Question 15: Do you have any advice for the Trolls out there who harass content creators? (no need to keep this answer clean.) 
I’ve never been trolled… yet. I imagine it’s just a matter of time. I suspect it’s because the comic is alternate history and most trolls don’t read that.  If I were harassed, how I respond would depend on what they did. At Cons, I’ve had guys try to flirt, but they never crossed the line into harassment. I imagine that’s because I’m white, a little older (and taller) than other women working Cons and I have a very “take no prisoners” attitude.
Question 16: Do you set yourself any deadlines or other tricks to keep yourself motivated?
I do set myself deadlines and I’m getting better at time management. Since I do so many Cons during the year, a lot of my time is spent organizing for those, i.e., travel arrangements, hotels, taxes, inventory, etc. Motivation has never been a problem for me. My husband calls me mono-polar manic.
Question 17: Apart from root beer, what is your favorite drink?
Iced Tea.
Question 18: Are you already a member of the root beer party and if not, what is the matter with you?
No, I am not. I’d love to join if I can drink another type of beverage.
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Question 20: What are your future plans involving web comics or anything else going on in your life?
I hope to put together a trade next year of the six issues which will include something very special. (It’s a secret.). We are also working on funding 32 page one shots. And since the anthology (Boston Metaphysical Society: Prelude) is complete, I’m writing the first ever Boston Metaphysical Society novel. I’ve also had fans want an RPG, but one thing at a time.
Wow!  This is cutting edge stuff here True Believers.  We have never had a member who didn’t like root beer.  Well, she still meets the love of comics criteria so we will let it pass with an honorary membership.  Welcome to the party Madeline, and try the Butterscotch Root Beer, you will be very surprised by that one.  So raise your glass to the Boston Metaphysical Society and as always True Believers, may your mug always be frosted and your root beer always foamy.

 

20 Questions with Comic Artists: Chris Grabowski from Poorly Drawn Thoughts

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We are back once again True Believers with our world famous interview segment 20 Questions.   (Just when you thought it was safe to go back online.)  This time we bring you a new member of the Root Beer Party, Chris Grabowski from Poorly Drawn Thoughts, you can check out his site here: http://www.poorlydrawnthoughts.com/

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We give a special shout out to Fellow Root Beer Party Alum James Boyd of Sunny Side Up for inviting Chris to the party.  But enough about us let’s meet the man himself:

Question 1: What got you started in doing a comic series?
I was sitting in a meeting one day at my day job and doodling on my notes. A friend and coworker saw what I was doing and said “Hey, those are pretty funny. You should do a webcomic.” So, without doing any research on the subject what so ever, I started drawing comic strips. After I felt I had something I liked I started publishing them.
Question 2: Who was you greatest influence?
Probably R. Crumb. He has this really incredible mix of humor, eroticism and social commentary that I have never seen anywhere else. He’s pretty incredible.
Question 3: What is your favorite root beer and why?
I’m actually not much of a soda drinker. I mainly just stick to water and coffee. If I had to pick I would say Mug because I like the dog on the label.
Question 4: What do you hope to accomplish with your comic?
I don’t know. Maybe earn some money off of it? I’m primarily a hobbyist when it comes to comics so I never really thought about things I could accomplish by doing this.
Question 5: Do you have any other artistic interests outside of comics?
I’m actually a pretty skilled guitar/bass player. I’ve been playing for a little over fifteen years, now.
Question 6: Do you see yourself as a professional cartoonist, or is this just something you do for yourself?
This is definitely something I just do for myself.
Question 7: What type of subject or humor do you consider out of bounds for your strips and why?
I don’t care for anything that is too violent. Cartoony violence (like punching someone with your beard) is one thing, but nothing too realistic. Especially sexual violence. There’s just not anything funny or cool about that. I also don’t care for most racial humor. We’re in a position in our country where we need to take race relations seriously and I don’t feel like that sort of humor is really helping anything. Good humor to me is based on shared experiences and unfortunately a lot of experiences in regards to race are not shared between races and making jokes about these sorts of things lately seems like it’s doing more harm than good.

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Question 8: What kind of equipment or style of drawing do you use?
I use an Intuos 2.0 drawpad/stylus by Wacom. Also my stuff is made using Clip Studio Paint Pro Edition. Before that I was using a Nintendo 3DS and a copy of Comic Workshop. As for style, I would say super minimalist. Also, I drew (ha, see what I did there) a lot of inspiration from old RPG style video games. I always liked there cut scenes.
Question 9: what sort of training or academic program did you pursue to become a cartoonist?
I took a couple of drawing classes in college but that is pretty much it.
Question 10: What has been the highlight of your cartooning career?
I’ve gotten to know a lot of really great people because of cartooning and lately I’ve been using my comics to help raise money for Give Kids the World (go to GKTW.org for more information about them. They are an incredible organization). So if anything has been a highlight it is definitely the new friends and the charity work.

(Here is the link:  http://gktw.org/ )
Question 11: What has been the lowest point in your cartooning career?
This is a real cathartic experience for me so low points tend to be things like, ‘I don’t feel like I really got my point across with a comic,’ or if I look back at one and think ‘Wow I really could have done that better.’
Question 12: Are collections of your work available beyond the web? If So where?
Nope. I’ve been putting together a photo album of all my stuff but I haven’t really put much thought towards a book or anything.
Question 13: Are there any other web comic artists that you really admire?
James Boyd from “Sunny Side Up” has been really cool. Also Dave Rine from “Punks Against Punks” and Matthew Mewhorter from “Cancer Owl.” All three of those are all really incredible comics.
Question 14: What kind of impact has cartooning had on your life and could you ever see yourself not doing it?
It has definitely had a positive impact on me. Like I said earlier, this has been a cathartic experience and it really gives me a chance to work out those negative emotions (fear, anxiety, anger, etc.). I can definitely see myself keeping this up for the foreseeable future.
Question 15: Do you have any advice for the Trolls out there who harass content creators? (no need to keep this answer clean.)
People are just people. Sometimes people are awesome and encouraging and sometimes they’re just dicks. Just ignore them.
Question 16: Do you set yourself any deadlines or other tricks to keep yourself motivated?
I have a self-imposed deadline of two comics by every Monday. Also I tend to write down ideas I have throughout the day and that actually keeps me motivated because there is always something to draw about.
Question 17: Apart from root beer, what is your favorite drink?
Coffee. Black, dark roast coffee.
Question 18: Are you already a member of the root beer party and if not, what is the matter with you?
No. I just found out about you guys. I’m not very internet savvy and I tend to not spend a lot of time online.
Question 19: What is the most challenging aspect of cartooning for you?
Drawing things I’ve never drawn before. I’m the kind of person who really loves to be challenged, so I love to try and put things in to my comics that I just couldn’t before.
Question 20: What are your future plans involving web comics or anything else going on in your life?
I have a couple of projects I’m working on that I can’t really say much about. I don’t want to be in a position where I tell you I’m doing something and year’s later people are like ‘Whatever happened to that thing you talked about?’ And I’m like ‘Well I guess it fell through.’ Although I am drawing informative comics about animals for the kids at my son’s preschool. I keep them black and white so the kids can color them. You can find them on my Facebook (Facebook.com/PoorlyDrawnThoughts) and Twitter (Twitter.com/PoorlyDrawnGuy) pages.

pokemon go

And there you have it True Believers, Straight from the man himself, welcome to the party Chris.  So we offer up a toast of Mug root beer (yes, the one with the dog on the label.) to chris Grabowski.  Check out his web page for more great comics as well as the Give Kids the World project.  And as always True Believers, until next time, may your mug always be frosted and your root beer always foamy.