20 Questions with Comic Creators: Peter Delgado of RPG Blues

25465606_1959753614345937_2022186652_n

     We are back once again True Believers with an all new interview with comic creators brought to you live from the Root Beer Party studios located at the vast Root Beer Party Estates in an undisclosed location of a far away land in an undiscovered country.  Today we have with us Peter Delgado of RPG Blues and he has brought with him a vast photo collection of nuns?  He seems very proud of this collection so we will humor him, but we know that what you really want to hear about is The magic behind the world famous comic RPG Blues.  

     You can catch up with the RPG Blues on his webpage here:  

http://rpgblues.com/

     So let’s get to know Peter and the inner workings of RPG Blues:

Dg_TvwvVQAA18_7

Question 1: What got you started in doing a comic series?
Once upon a time, back it 1997, I was at home reading an issue of Dragon Magazine (if by any chance you just thought the word ‘nerd’ after reading the previous line, I swear to god, I’ll find out where you live and pelt you to death with my sparkly dice…….what?) and thumbed my way to the “dragon mirth” page. After reading a few of the strips I thought to myself that I could do this too and that’s how it started.

Question 2: Who was you greatest influence?
Stephen DeStefano , Wendy and Richard Pini, Sergio Aragone, Stan Sakai, Vaughn Bode, Berni Wrightson and Elzie Crisler Segar.

Question 3: What is your favorite root beer and why?
ew…

Question 4: What do you hope to accomplish with your comic?
Just to put a smile on someone’s face (cheesy, I know. but true).

DobXmPVUwAAItWH

Question 5: Do you have any other artistic interests outside of comics?
Does world domination count?

Question 6: Do you see yourself as a professional cartoonist, or is this just something you do for yourself?
My arts been published a lot over the years. But I don’t see myself as a pro by any means. I b a hack 😀

Question 7: What type of subject or humor do you consider out of bounds for your strips and why?
Politics/current events. It’s the easiest way to lose favor with readers.

Question 8: What kind of equipment or style of drawing do you use?
I’m old school, pencil/paper/inking pens and or color pencils/light box/scanner/photoshop.

Dpk0wT8VsAAYYRU

Question 9: what sort of training or academic program did you pursue to become a cartoonist?
I went to The school of visual arts (4 years for cartooning/animation) and New York City College of Technology (2 years for advertising).

Question 10: What has been the highlight of your cartooning career?
The first time my work got published over @ Dragon Magazine.

Question 11: What has been the lowest point in your cartooning career?
The day my dad died back in 2003. On the same month when my first compilation book came out. He was excited about it (more than me) but never got the chance to see it. I stop cartooning for a while and almost gave it up completely because of it.

Question 12: Are collections of your work available beyond the web? If So where?
Rpg Blues ran in several issues of Dragon Magazine before moving on to Knights of the Dinner Table Magazine where it ran for 2 and a half years. It also spawned 2 compilation books published by Wingnut Games.

1172209
Question 13: Are there any other web comic artists that you really admire?
I’ve meet a lot of talented/amazing cartooning peeps thanks to Twitter. And thus, waaaay too many to list.

Question 14: What kind of impact has cartooning had on your life and could you ever see yourself not doing it?
See myself not cartooning??? Blasphemous!! *rage!* But seriously, I never thought about it. I’ll get back to you on that.

Question 15: Do you have any advice for the Trolls out there who harass content creators? (no need to keep this answer clean.)
I don’t have the time to write a 1,800 page essay about that subject.

Question 16: Do you set yourself any deadlines or other tricks to keep yourself motivated?
I use to. To the point where I made myself physically sick. Nowadays, I try not to force it. If the art wants to be done, then it’ll be done and not before. Unless it’s a paying gig, then that’s different.

DhV1PAfUEAU_GXZ

Question 17: Apart from root beer, what is your favorite drink?
Air.

Question 18: Are you already a member of the root beer party and if not, what is the matter with you?
O.O

(Of course you are, despite your aversion to root beer and your obsession with nuns, we welcome you into our ranks. -Editor)

Question 19: What is the most challenging aspect of cartooning for you?
Trying to come up with ideas for strips that are funny/witty.

Question 20: What are your future plans involving comics or anything else going on in your life?
I try not to make plans (they never work out the way you hope) I just take things as the come and run with it.

Dpfpky5U4AEpXVj

    So there you have it True Believers, a peek into the mind of one of today’s top comic creators.  We are signing off now, but tune in next week for another one of our world famous interview segments.  Until Next time True Believers, may your mug always be frosted and your Root Beer always foamy.  We will leave you with some more of Peter’s great work:  

DpENYgTXoAc26z0

Do_6O6xX4AENM2B

DlSJy64U0AA6OGj

Dl7iAmCXgAAbhvz

DjjJZ2oX0AED9pY

DjB9ggnUwAAA-PC

convo-of-the-dead-b

Advertisements

20 Questions with Comic Creators: Mat Washburn of Evan Yeti

25465606_1959753614345937_2022186652_n

     We are back once again True Believers with another episode of our world famous interview segment:  20 Questions with Comic Creators.  Today we are live from the glorious Root Beer Party Estates in an undisclosed location of a far off land in an undiscovered country.  Today we have with us Mat Washburn of the epic fantasy comic Evan Yeti.  You can check out Mat’s website here:  

http://www.matwashburn.com/

     Evan Yeti is a great comic series about a young yeti who is orphaned from his family by a mad scientist and his evil army who capture his family.  Evan sets out to find and reunite with his family with a little help from his friends that he meets along the way.  It is a hero’s quest for the 21st century.  So let’s get to know Mat Washburn.

page92

Question 1: What got you started in doing a comic series?

I had always drawn comics as a kid and all through school. After school I mostly worked on music and felt my drawing skills slipping away. I wanted to create a comic that had all the weirdness and rebellious energy from the comics I made as a kid and try to learn how to draw better-er. I decided to make a webcomic because I figured if people would actually read it I would feel obligated to finish it.

Question 2: Who was you greatest influence?

Rob Schrab, Doug TenNapel and Steve Purcell are my top three favorite longform comic artists. If you look at Evan Yeti, I think their influence (along with Matt Groening) on my art is embarrassingly obvious.

Question 3: What is your favorite root beer and why?

I’m not too picky about my root beer. I’d have to say Stuarts in the glass bottle is top notch. Goes down smooth.

1

Question 4: What do you hope to accomplish with your comic?

Well the Evan Yeti webcomic has ended (for now). People often ask if I’ll write another Evan story. I actually started writing a second story as I was writing the first one. But I’m more likely to make an Evan Yeti video game before another comic. I felt like I was able to accomplish a lot with Evan. I made a webcomic, printed it as issues and a graphic novel, made t-shirts, minifigures, gave presentations at libraries and still show art exhibits with original Evan art and some large replicas of things in the comic – like the snow rat vehicle. So I haven’t set anymore goals for Evan as of yet.

evancast-amation

 

Question 5: Do you have any other artistic interests outside of comics?

I compose music for commercials, video games and short film and play in a band when I can. Currently I’m on a video game creating kick. I like making games for mobile. I have one published for Android and iPhone called Save Baby James and another game hopefully published by the time this is posted called Spider Rider.

Question 6: Do you see yourself as a professional cartoonist, or is this just something you do for yourself?

I don’t think that’s for me to say. I’ll keep trying to learn and make things I can be proud of and let others decide if they think it’s professional or not.

Question 7: What type of subject or humor do you consider out of bounds for your strips and why?

In my personal life humor is king. I will gladly throw my integrity away for a stupid joke. My comics however are pretty safe. I like to make comics that I consider fun and that also have some heart. I don’t like to limit who can join in on the fun by being too crass. So just a little crass.

Question 8: What kind of equipment or style of drawing do you use?

For Evan I would sketch a page on graph paper with a mechanical pencil. Then I lay marker paper over that and ink over a lightboard with a Faber-Castell brush pen. Then scan the inks into the computer and color with Photoshop. I colored over the ink lines with colors because I like the way it makes the characters pop. If I had a tablet it would have speed pages up considerably. Something to consider for next time I suppose.

Question 9: what sort of training or academic program did you pursue to become a cartoonist?

No school. I’m a terrible student. But there are some books that I learned a lot from. Particularly books by Will Eisner and Scott McCloud.

UtF-Evan-Yeti-t

Question 10: What has been the highlight of your cartooning career?

All the cool people I’ve met. Fellow storytellers of all types of experience levels and many different styles. Telling their stories and jokes and helping others tell theirs. I’m not good at being part of a community as I’m fiercely independent but the webcomic community has been so supportive and creative and is what I miss the most about working on Evan.

Question 11: What has been the lowest point in your cartooning career?

Nothing about cartooning has brought me down but when life absolutely sucker punches me in the guts it makes it hard to create work that is fun or has enthusiasm behind it.

Question 12: Are collections of your work available beyond the web? If So where?

Outside of the webernet there is just me selling books and stuff at my art exhibits and comic cons.

You can order Evan yeti comics on his webpage.  Get the whole set, they are amazing!  -Editor

Question 13: Are there any other web comic artists that you really admire?

Yes and I hate to start naming names cause I know I’ll leave out a bunch of great people on accident. However, it’s no secret I’ve been a big fan of Mark Stokes (Zombie Boy), Jazyl Homavazir (The Beast Legion), and Crispin Wood (Small Blue Yonder).

Question 14: What kind of impact has cartooning had on your life and could you ever see yourself not doing it?

It keeps me sane-ish and helps me express things I otherwise don’t think I would know how. I went to school for cosmetology and my instructor saw me drawing in my textbook and said “You love drawing don’t you? I bet you’ll draw no matter what you do in life.” And as usual, she was right.

page75

Question 15: Do you have any advice for the Trolls out there who harass content creators? (no need to keep this answer clean.)

That’s a tough one. I’m all about free speech, but I also don’t like the idea of someone giving up on their ideas just because they were discouraged. So my advice to trolls? Tear artists down all you want, but when you decide to create something we’ll be watching. And your success may depend on our ability to forgive.

Question 16: Do you set yourself any deadlines or other tricks to keep yourself motivated?

For Evan Yeti I posted a page every other week. That way I had a free week and an “Evan week”.

Question 17: Apart from root beer, what is your favorite drink?

I had to quit Mt. Dew. I drank it too much and didn’t like the idea that I couldn’t stop. So I stopped. Now I don’t have a favorite drink and that’s a good thing.

Question 18: Are you already a member of the root beer party and if not, what is the matter with you?

Yes *glug glug* I am!

page20

Question 19: What is the most challenging aspect of cartooning for you?

That first sketch. Everything hinges on all those first calculations and decisions and the mistakes you make if not caught carry on through the rest of the process and get harder to fix as they are integrated. After the initial sketch is done though, each step after that gets gradually easier for me.

Question 20: What are your future plans involving comics or anything else going on in your life?

I’m sure I’ll get around to the next Evan Yeti story eventually. I miss the little guy. I also have another comic idea that is much smaller I might pursue first. Currently though I am developing three mobile games and promoting my game Save Baby James!

You can check out the Save Baby James Video Game Here:

https://www.savebabyjames.com/?fbclid=IwAR2brs6yFqKkP-GoiTcepUu_8HJ5b48SdrC5BO8f4YEdHkcZEXLEk-UQKao

 

So there you have it True Believers, another amazing 20 questions interview and a look behind the scenes at the artists and creators that make it all happen.  Be sure to come back next time for another behind the scenes look at how all your favorite comics are made.  Until Next time True Believers,  may your mug always be frosted and your root beer always foamy.  

page54

20 Questions with Comic Creators: Bill Abbott of Spectickles

25465606_1959753614345937_2022186652_n

     Welcome back once again True Believers, we are here once again broadcasting live from the vast Root Beer Party Estates in an undisclosed location in an undiscovered region of an unknown land.  Today we have with us our good friend Bill Abbott of Spectickles comics which you can find here:  

http://www.abbottcartoons.com/product-category/cartoons/

     Spectickles reminds me of classic comics like The Lockhorns or Andy Capp, but with the fantastical elements of The Far Side.  We follow a couple marked by their signature Spectickles at various times and places throughout history or even fantasy worlds.  It is sort of a parable of sorts that throughout all of history and even art lies the same underlying fundamental relationship between two people.  No matter what form creativity may take us, we are still social creatures trying to figure out how to live with one another.  

     Bill brings us a great tribute to that ultimate relationship we call marriage, and we follow it throughout the infinite characters and timelines of history to understand that the true root of making a relationship work is at it’s very heart, humor.  In a single panel, Bill reminds us of that fundamental truth.  So let’s sit down and get to know the man of the hour:  Bill Abbott

437d9f70dc8d2e4779be366c49476588

1. What got you started in doing a comic series?
My cartoon Spectickles evolved over time – it wasn’t so much started with a specific intent such as making it a series, as it was drawing the goofy ideas that wander around in my head like it was Grand Central Station on dollar beer night.

2. Who was your greatest influence?
There were quite a few, really, and not all necessarily cartoonists. Jim Unger, Charles Schulz, and Mike Peters from the comics pages, and Mort Gerberg, Mischa Richter, Charles Saxon, and Robert Weber from the New Yorker. Just stunningly brilliant. I find the writings of H.L. Mencken and Mark Twain really inspiring and very, very funny – if you haven’t read, “Innocents Abroad”, you’ve missed out on something extraordinarily humorous.

3. What is your favorite root beer, and why?
It would have to be A&W – a family favorite from when I was a kid – root beer floats in the Adirondacks.

4. What do you hope to accomplish with your comic?
There’s nothing more rewarding to me as a cartoonist than to see someone chuckle or laugh at my work, then feel compelled to share it with someone else. That’s an amazing feeling that’ll never grow old. In the professional sense, I’m blown away I’ve gotten as far as I have, to be honest.

image002

5. Do you have any other artistic interests outside of comics?
I’ve always wanted to do more illustration work. I never grow tired of flipping through books filled with the art of Arthur Rackham, Charles Dana Gibson and others from the Golden Age of illustration. It may be somewhat anachronistic now and have very few market outlets, but that’s the type of work I’d really love to spend time developing and practicing. I’ve played guitar for many years and have been teaching myself some classical, although the quality of my playing is enough to scare children and small dogs.

6: Do you see yourself as a professional cartoonist, or is this just something you do for yourself?
I don’t really think of it that way – it’s just something I love doing. Although when deadlines loom large, I tend to love it a bit less.

image001
7: What type of subject or humor do you consider out of bounds for your strips and why?
It’s a matter of personal taste and viewpoint, but for me, I give everything the Grandmother Test. My grandmother was a wonderful woman with a great sense of humor. She had a specific set of values that were imbued in our family and guided our behavior and conduct. If I wouldn’t show the cartoon to my grandmother, it doesn’t get drawn. I know that’s not for everyone, but it is for me, and the people who follow my work.
8: What kind of equipment or style of drawing do you use?
Until very recently, I drew on Strathmore Bristol board with an old Rotring mechanical pencil that’s heavy enough to be used for a Medieval bludgeoning device of mortal destruction, and an even older Pelikan fountain pen with an M250 medium nib – really a pleasure to draw with. But due to the demands of producing 2 daily cartoons for syndication, I’ve switched to all digital to speed up the process. I have the Surface Pro 5 which is really great, and use the Clip Studio Paint Pro drawing program. I’m far from having perfected drawing digitally, but I’m slowly figuring it out.

spec160829-1-400x478
9: what sort of training or academic program did you pursue to become a cartoonist?
If you take a pen, a blank sheet of paper, close your eyes and let the pen wander aimlessly over the page for about an hour, you would have a reasonable facsimile of the path I followed to becoming a cartoonist. I actually spent all of my adult life in the military – 24 years total deploying frequently, which is a pretty tough way to launch a career in the comics. But I’m fortunate that the stars aligned and this is ultimately where I’ve ended up – pursuing something I’ve had a lifelong passion for – cartooning.
10: What has been the highlight of your cartooning career?
That’s a tough one – there’s so many events that I didn’t see coming which have made this experience pretty amazing. The first time I received a call from a greeting card company to license some of my cartoons was a big one. Getting syndicated was definitely huge. The group that have assembled to spend time on my Facebook page is a big-time highlight – really an extraordinary group of very kind, and very funny people – some of their comments are funnier than my cartoons they’re commenting on!

image003
11: What has been the lowest point in your cartooning career?
I would have to say it was the first time I received a rejection slip for my work. When you’re first getting started it’s sometimes hard to see that it’s not a rejection of you personally, and maybe not even your work if it’s a case of bad timing – it’s just a necessary part of professional cartooning. But it’s tough the first time one shows up in your inbox.
12: Are collections of your work available beyond the web? If So where?
There are a couple – there’s a Spectickles cartoon collection that was published by Willow Creek Press, which is available on Amazon, and a Percenters collection with my earlier work, also available through Amazon.

thV8TEG5PS

(you can find it on amazon Here:

https://smile.amazon.com/Spectickles-Bill-Abbott/dp/1623435455/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1539197181&sr=8-1&keywords=Spectickles+by+Bill+Abbott
13: Are there any other web comic artists that you really admire?
Tons. I really enjoyed listening to the Webcomics Weekly podcasts put out by Scott Kurtz, Kris Straub, Dave Kellett, and Brad Guigar, which is how I was introduced to their work. I don’t follow any now with regularity, but I’m blown away by the talent that’s out there and the creative way they’ve broken away from the traditional comics model.
14: What kind of impact has cartooning had on your life and could you ever see yourself not doing it?
Enormous. I’ve had the opportunity to sit down and talk with my heroes – people whose work I have great admiration for, and never once did they seek a restraining order or try to pepper spray me in the face. So far. It’s been the perfect creative outlet for me, a form of art therapy, and I’ve been fortunate that it’s been financially rewarding as well.

image004
15: Do you have any advice for the trolls out there who harass content creators? (no need to keep this answer clean.)
Yes. Life is waiting for you outside your Mom’s basement. Put on some pants, put down the game controller, ascend those creaky old stairs and experience life for yourself rather than acting as a virtual peeping tom in the lives of others. It’s creepy. Just stop it.
16: Do you set yourself any deadlines or other tricks to keep yourself motivated?
Because I have to produce two daily gag panels for syndicates, I can’t really afford to miss deadlines. I find that if I get my writing done early in the day and the drawing/coloring and other stuff after that, I can stay on top of the work.
17: Apart from root beer, what is your favorite drink?
In the words of H.L. Mencken, I’m ombibulous. I enjoy wine, so I drink Cabernet. I also like cigars with which a good single malt scotch or good Cognac fits the bill, and much to the chagrin of my wife, I drink too much Diet Coke because I just love the stuff.

00d473ab2fec5969cb34eec0332beb87--bill-obrien-funny-cartoons
18: Are you already a member of the root beer party and if not, what is the matter with you?
I believe I am, but I wouldn’t blame you if you changed the locks on the place when I wasn’t looking.
19: What is the most challenging aspect of cartooning for you?
Not settling on putting out mediocre work just to meet a deadline rather than give the best I’ve got. When you’re facing a deadline, it can be tough, but I never want to allow myself to cross that line.
20: What are your future plans involving web comics or anything else going on in your life?
Cartooning-wise, I’d love to get one – even just one, into the pages of The New Yorker. That’s been a life-long goal which has eluded me thus far. Outside of cartooning, I want to buy a boat just big enough to live on for short periods of time and make it my floating studio as I navigate the Great Lakes, canals and rivers in the northeast. Oh yeah – and rule the world. With my wife’s permission, of course.

spec150319clr

     So there you have it True Believers, another look behind the curtain into the making of all your favorite comics.  We’d like to thank Bill Abbott for coming all the way out here to the vast Root Beer Party Estates, but he has spent much of his life deployed to distant lands, so he knows the role and perils of life as a cartoonist well.  So let’s have a look at more of Bill’s work:  

spc032817_color-400x456

spc070217_color-copy

e0db62db7d902543c408c4904d372e96

ca8e709e20f2628402dc8d4b3aec4ee8

17ddd60b1cf227734ad7ce4b6b3c9750

     Be sure to join us again True Believers as we meet more of your heroes of The Root Beer Party and as always, until next time, may your mug always be frosted and your root beer always foamy.  

20 Questions with Comic Creators: Dan Thompson of Rip Haywire, Harley, Brevity, Lost Sheep & Kidspot

25465606_1959753614345937_2022186652_n

     We are back once again True Believers, broadcasting live from the exclusive Root Beer Party Estates, in an undisclosed location in a long lost region of an undiscovered country.  Today we have with us the busiest man in comics today:  Dan Thompson who makes all the comics in the newspapers.  He does the adventure epic Rip Haywire, a lighthearted parody of the classic adventure comics of the 1930’s.  this comic has two continuities, a weekly story Monday through Saturday and then a separate Sunday continuity.  he is also doing a Young Rip Haywire series as well.  You can read Rip Haywire daily Here;     https://www.gocomics.com/riphaywire

     Dan also does another comic strip called Harley, about a fun loving motorcycle rider who lives the grand life of danger and fun.  You can check out his crazy shenanigans here:     https://www.gocomics.com/harley

     What must already be a monumental work load for any comic creator is only the beginning for Dan who has also taken over the comic strip Brevity, a wonderful gag a day strip which you can check out here:    https://www.gocomics.com/brevity

     And finally, we have Dan’s work on KidSpot, a children’s activity page with puzzles, humor and just a little cognitive development thrown in for good measure.  You can check out this page here:      https://www.gocomics.com/kidspot

     Did I say finally?  What I meant to say was Dan also does the comic strip Lost Sheep about a plucky sheep who wants more out of life then just following the flock.  You can read that comic Here:    https://www.gocomics.com/lostsheep/2018/10/05

     Did I say we were done yet?  No, Dan also does comics for the Tulsa Pets Magazine, which bring a much needed boost of levity to a magazine focusing on the care and management of all of our animal friends.  You can read his Pet comics here:    http://www.tulsapetsmagazine.com/?s=dan+Thompson

     Despite all of this work he has somehow found the time to travel to the other side of the world to meet with us at our top secret and vast Root Beer Party Estates to answer all the questions from you our True Believers.  So let’s get to know the hardest working man in comics:  Dan Thompson.  

TBAP-VPost-AwesomeStoryTelling

Question 1: What got you started in doing a comic series?
I had tried to get a comic syndicated for a few years with no luck and when Gocomics started Comics Sherpa, I added a strip called “Lost Sheep” to see if I had what it takes to do it longer than just 24 strips I’d submitted to a syndicate.

large_rec-201701251556
Question 2: Who was your greatest influence?
I’d say Hanna Barbara Saturday morning cartoons … It seems like their character designs are etched into my brain and everything that I draw comes pretty close to that, and I like cartoons and artists that create in similar styles.
Question 3: What is your favorite root beer and why?
I would say “Hires” root beer … It was my go to root beer growing up … and I liked the logo
Question 4: What do you hope to accomplish with your comic?
I’d like to have a unique voice in the field that people enjoy reading, something sustainable and popular.

Rip_haywire_3755
Question 5: Do you have any other artistic interests outside of comics?
not at all.
Question 6: Do you see yourself as a professional cartoonist, or is this just something you do for yourself?
Both. If you don’t do it for yourself, what’s the point?
Question 7: What type of subject or humor do you consider out of bounds for your strips and why?
Things you’d never do or say in front of your mom, but I guess that depend on the kind of mom you have.

Cartoon stock
Question 8: What kind of equipment or style of drawing do you use?
Bristol board, a pencil and markers, but I work on a Cintiq now and I use Clip studio paint (manga studio) for mostly everything, and photo shop for coloring Sunday strips.
Question 9: what sort of training or academic program did you pursue to become a cartoonist?
I taught myself cartooning, read everything I could get my hands on, Cartoonist Profiles, Hogan’s alley have great interviews with some of the greatest cartoonists to ever work in comics, and just studying the reprint books. hitting every used book store across the country looking for reprints from the popular to the forgotten newspaper comics
Question 10: What has been the highlight of your cartooning career?
Being able to work in the field I love, getting the opportunities and the breaks to keep drawing and writing comics.
Question 11: What has been the lowest point in your cartooning career?
These 20 questions.
Question 12: Are collections of your work available beyond the web? If So where?
I have reprint books available for Rip Haywire and Harley on Amazon.

61Rfomxbe3L._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_

You can find Dan’s Author page on Amazon Here:    https://smile.amazon.com/Dan-Thompson/e/B005BLQO58/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_2?qid=1538772888&sr=8-2
Question 13: Are there any other web comic artists that you really admire?
I like Pat Sandy, Amanda El-Dweek, Stephen Beals … I like a lot of web only cartoonists, but I read them daily on gocomics.
Question 14: What kind of impact has cartooning had on your life and could you ever see yourself not doing it?
It’s a great creative field, but I could see myself as a plumber.

blog_image_3746_4367_Harley_by_Dan_Thompson_201703061130
Question 15: Do you have any advice for the Trolls out there who harass content creators? (no need to keep this answer clean.)
Trolls are gonna troll … I wish they thought of the sacrifice, time and effort it takes for cartoonists to actually bring them something they can dump on … As a cartoonist, you have to let it go.
Question 16: Do you set yourself any deadlines or other tricks to keep yourself motivated?
Waiting until the last minute usually works for me … that and coffee.
Question 17: Apart from root beer, what is your favorite drink?
I drink coffee a lot … We try to stay away from soda with high fructose corn syrup in it, but every once in a while, they’ll sell the big brands with sugar … I love Coca-Cola and Dr. Pepper … Dr. Pepper is extra special for those great Johnny Hart ads Hart worked on for them with the caveman “Harmon” … so great.

3285472229_638b3de209_z
Question 18: Are you already a member of the root beer party and if not, what is the matter with you?
yes
Question 19: What is the most challenging aspect of cartooning for you?
Writing a gag that people will love … that should be the biggest challenge for everyone. Art is only 1/2 of cartooning

Brevity - bv160131comb_ts.tif
Question 20: What are your future plans involving comics or anything else going on in your life?
As of today, nothing to report just working on the usual … Brevity, Harley, Rip Haywire and Kidspot

 

   So there you have it True Believers, Dan Thompson, the hardest working man in comics.  As he downs another well deserved frosty mug of the elixir of life that is root beer, let’s check out some of his comics from the Tulsa Pets Magazine here:

 

     So thanks for spending all your free time here with us Dan, and a special thanks to all the billions of True Believers out there who keep all of our comics alive.  Until next time true Believers, may your mug always be frosted and your root beer always foamy.  

rip01

lost sheep

danthompson1

blog_image_3755_4492_Harley_Comic_201702281537

7hGTuux

blog_image_3746_4368_harleystripbiker_201702231550

4a9da47d935ee8d49829f5b5eda952f3.jpg

 

20 Questions with Comic Creators: John Rose of Barney Google & Snuffy Smith

oogl25465606_1959753614345937_2022186652_n

     Welcome back once again True Believers for another one of our world renowned segments:  20 Questions with Comic Creators!   We are here live from the Root Beer Party Studios in an undisclosed location in a far off land in an undiscovered country.  We are here to talk with one of our legacy comic creators and Root Beer Party Member John Rose of Barney Google and Snuffy Smith.  You can check out his comic here:     http://snuffysmithcomics.com/      

     Barney Google made his comic debut back in 1919 where the cigar-smoking, sports-loving, poker-playing, girl-chasing ne’er-do-well Barney Google was born.  Barney was the focus of the strip until 1934 when Snuffy Smith was introduced and soon eclipsed Barney as the star of the series.  Our good friend John Rose took over the comic in 2001 and has made the bodacious comic his own ever since. 

Snuffy Smith has had a huge impact on American comic culture including Barney Googles famous horse Spark Plug which gave a certain uncle of Peanuts Creator Charles Schultz the idea to nickname the soon to be comic genius “Sparky.”  Snuffy Smith has appeared in a series of his own movies

MV5BZWEyODM0NmQtMzllMC00MWJhLTlhMmItM2I3ZTRmNzMwYjU0L2ltYWdlXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMDMxMjQwMw@@._V1_UY1200_CR85,0,630,1200_AL_

and even had a postage stamp dedicated to Barney Google in 1995.

4924951094_21a71fd652_b

Recently Snuffy Smith was even chosen for some public service announcements to prevent forest fires.  Look out Smokey the Bear.

Snuffycolor4

So lets meet the man who will be at the helm when Barney Google and Snuffy Smith turns 100 years old next year.  John Rose.

ROSEatDrawingBoard-jpg

Question 1: What got you started in doing a comic series?

I have always wanted to be a cartoonist and I was blessed to be hired by the legendary Fred Lasswell as his inking assistant in 1998. That began my work on the Barney Google and Snuffy Smith comic strip.
Question 2: Who was you greatest influence?

As far as this particular comic strip goes, definitely Fred Lasswell and Billy DeBeck. But other cartooning influences for me throughout my career include Mike Peters, Mort Walker, Jeff MacNelly, Walt Disney and many more.

Question 3: What is your favorite root beer and why?

A & W root beer. Probably because we have a KFC/A&W Restaurant near our house so it’s the brand I have most often.

zone

Question 4: What do you hope to accomplish with your comic?

Make people smile each day and think back to a simpler time.

Question 5: Do you have any other artistic interests outside of comics?

I admire and enjoy viewing many other types of art, but comic art is the only art I personally create.

Question 6: Do you see yourself as a professional cartoonist, or is this just something you do for yourself?

I consider myself a professional cartoonist and I am incredibly thankful for the opportunity to be one.

rose_j_barneygoogle2

Question 7: What type of subject or humor do you consider out of bounds for your strips and why?

In the comic strip, I only comment on politics or government in a very general sense. I do not ever get politically specific in any way.

Question 8: What kind of equipment or style of drawing do you use?
I am mostly traditional. I use small point brushes, india ink and the pigma micron pens (with archival ink) in a variety of sizes. I ink the comic strip on Bristol Board. But then I scan the comic strip into Photoshop when I am done inking and clean it up and size it. Then I email it to King Features Syndicate for distribution. Oh, and I use lots of white-out during the inking process! (:

Fish7
Question 9: what sort of training or academic program did you pursue to become a cartoonist?
I graduated from James Madison University in Harrisonburg, VA with a double-major in Art and Art History in 1986. But I worked on the school newspaper, The Breeze, as a cartoonist for the entire four years that I was a student. I feel that I got a great deal of my cartooning education there, as well.

Question 10: What has been the highlight of your cartooning career?
For me this is a two-part answer. The highlights were being chosen by Fred Lasswell to work with him as his inking assistant in 1998 and then being chosen by King Features to be the cartoonist for the Barney Google and Snuffy Smith comic strip in 2001. It is the greatest honor of my professional career to be entrusted to carry on the legacy of this wonderful comic strip.

Question 11: What has been the lowest point in your cartooning career?

Can’t really think of one because if you keep working hard and don’t give up, eventually the low points turn into high points.

Question 12: Are collections of your work available beyond the web? If So where?

Yes, I have three Barney Google and Snuffy Smith comic strip book collections. They can all be found by searching “Snuffy Smith” on Amazon.com. I also had an original 10-page Snuffy Smith comic book story published in Charlton Spotlight #9.

th

You can find the books here:    https://www.amazon.com/Bodacious-Best-Snuffy-Smith-Collection/dp/1300283300   

 

Question 13: Are there any other web comic artists that you really admire?

Yes! Bob Scott who creates the Bear With Me comic strip for the web. I love his style. He is such an amazing artist and I really enjoy his sense of humor.

Question 14: What kind of impact has cartooning had on your life and could you ever see yourself not doing it?

Cartooning has always had a big impact on my life. First as a fan and then as a professional cartoonist (and also still a fan!). I have always wanted to be a cartoonist, so I am very fortunate to get to do it every day. I could never see myself not doing it.

content

Question 15: Do you have any advice for the Trolls out there who harass content creators? (no need to keep this answer clean.)

As a creator, don’t let it get to you. If you are making yourself laugh, you are making others laugh, too. Create what you find funny and others will find it funny, too. Plus, you’ll have lots of fun creating it!

Question 16: Do you set yourself any deadlines or other tricks to keep yourself motivated?

I have a daily deadline so that forces me to be motivated. Getting out of the studio for a walk or a change of scenery can help.

Question 17: Apart from root beer, what is your favorite drink?

A half Diet Coke-half Coke mix.

s-l300

Are you sure it isn’t ‘Shine?  – Editor  

Question 18: Are you already a member of the root beer party and if not, what is the matter with you?

Yes, I am! (:

Question 19: What is the most challenging aspect of cartooning for you?

Daily deadlines are the most challenging part, but I truly really enjoy the whole process.

Question 20: What are your future plans involving comics or anything else going on in your life?

I hope to continue drawing the Barney Google and Snuffy Smith comic strip for many, many years to come. All my friends at King Features are wonderful to work with! I am bodaciously blessed to get to create this comic strip each day and I am very thankful for each and everyone of our readers! In 2019, the comic strip celebrates its 100th anniversary and I think we will have some fun things in store for our readers!

Cold-7

12345

1234

123

12

1

So there you have it True Believers, another great interview segment with the creators and Root Beer Party Members who make all your favorite comics.  Just another peak behind the curtain of America’s favorite hillbillies.  So let’s go out and read some great “Bodacious” comics from the comic that invented the term, and as always True Believers, may your mug always be frosted and your root beer always foamy.